Matheny to be Cards’ new manager…

November 14, 2011

> I’m definitely going to have at least a little respect for the Cardinals’ new manager in 2012, and possibly years after.

> Former Brewers and Cardinals catcher Mike Matheny has been named the Cardinals’ new manager, replacing Tony La Russa, who retired right after the Cards’ 11th World Series title. This was a somewhat interesting choice, considering Matheny has not Major League managing experience- or even Minor League managing experience. But, he’s one of the most respected guys in the game. He still has my respect, at least, and hopefully I don’t lose that too soon. I don’t want to see this guy pulling any TLR-like shenanigans.

During his Major League career as a catcher, Matheny hit .239 with the Brewers (five years), Cardinals (five years), Giants (two years), and Blue Jays (one year), playing from 1994-2006. He was one of the better defensive catchers during that time, winning four Gold Gloves in his career.

Anyway, the three previous Cards managers- La Russa, Joe Torre, and Whitey Herzog- all had previous Major League managing experience, along with playoff experience. That’s why I find it interesting that they’d just hand the reins over to Matheny, who doesn’t even have Minor League managing experience.

> Anyway, with the biggest news of the day out of the way, let’s get to the Hot Stove news…

> So this Cuban outfielder has literally come out of nowhere over the last few weeks. His name is Yoenis Cespedes, and apparently he’s supposed to be one of the best players in history to emerge from Cuba. The 26-year old is considered a true five-tool player, and many teams are interested in him. The Cubs are going to hold a private workout with him this week, and the other teams interested in Cespedes are the Red Sox, Phillies, Indians, Blue Jays, Pirates, Rangers, Tigers, Nationals, Athletics, Marlins, and Yankees. It doesn’t surprise me that the Brewers aren’t part of that list, since they’re outfield should be set for the next couple of years with Ryan Braun, Corey Hart, and the Nyjer Morgan/Carlos Gomez platoon.

But back to Cespedes- he shouldn’t have any problems finding a Major League team to sign with. Apparently, his contract is expected to be similar to that of Aroldis Chapman’s $30 million deal that he signed with the Reds in 2010.

> The Diamondbacks re-signed second baseman Aaron Hill to a two-year deal, reportedly worth $11 million. He hit over .300 after being acquired from the Blue Jays at the Trade Deadline. Hill had a monster season with the Jays in 2009, hitting 36 homers and considered a MVP candidate, but hasn’t been able to maintain that type of power since.

> Here’s a Brewers-related topic. Tom Haudricourt, a writer for MJS, brought up the fact that, since Prince Fielder rejected the Brewers’ five-year, $100 million offer back in Spring Training, the Brewers’ financial situation has changed a lot. Here’s a list of a few deals and extensions the Brewers are currently in the middle of:

Yovani Gallardo: Signed through 2014 on a five-year, $30.1 million deal

Corey Hart: Signed through 2013 on a three-year, $26.5 million deal

Ryan Braun: Signed through 2020 on two extensions- eight-year, $45 million deal, and five-year, $105 million deal

Randy Wolf: Signed through 2012 on a three-year, $29.5 million deal

Rickie Weeks: Signed through 2014 on a four-year, $38.5 million deal

And those are pretty much the main deals the Brewers are in the middle of. That’s a lot of money invested in core players, and the Brewers also want to extend starters Zack Greinke and Shaun Marcum (or at least one of them) on top of it. That doesn’t leave very much room for Fielder, but he probably wouldn’t have signed anyway.

My only problem is the likelihood of the Brewers just handing the job to Mat Gamel. He has a little Major League experience. When he first came up a few years back, I thought he was going to be the next Braun- a young hitter who could hit for average. But, he was the hampered with injuries and inconsistency when given the chance at the Major League level. Gamel hit .310 in the Minors this year, but went just 3-for-26 during a short stint in the Majors in the middle of the season.

> Anyway, that’s about all I’ve got for now. Feel free to leave your thoughts, if you have any.

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Sveum considered front-runner for Sox managerial position

November 5, 2011

> The Brewers could soon be saying their farewells to their long-time hitting coach, Dale Sveum. Sveumer- a nickname he’s earned over the years in Milwaukee- is considered by many sources to be the primary candidate to occupy Boston’s managerial vacancy, which was left by Terry Francona. In my opinion, Francona didn’t need to be fired, but, after a collapse like the Sox had in September, something had to be done.

Anyway, back to Sveum. He was the third base coach for the Red Sox back in 2004- one of their World Series years- and 2005. He actually received a lot of criticism due to the rate of runners, who were sent by him, getting thrown out at home. But that doesn’t faze him, apparently.

After Ned Yost was fired with 12 games left to go in 2008 season, the Brewers’ most recent playoff year before 2011, Sveum took over for those 12 games, and the Brewers went 7-5 under his management. But that’s his only managing experience in the Majors.

I guess I wouldn’t mind Sveum leaving- it wouldn’t kill the Brewers. It’s always tough to tell if a hitting coach is doing his job (unless you’re a fan of a team like the Padres, Mariners, Athletics, and so on), but my biggest question for him, at least in 2011, is this- why couldn’t he get Casey McGehee out of his season-long slump? That’s what hitting coaches are there for. But I guess that wouldn’t matter much in Boston- most of the guys over there can already hit, and Sveum wouldn’t even be the hitting coach.

Anyway, if the rumors are true, goodbye and good luck to Sveum- he had a decent run as the hitting coach over here.

> Apparently Matt Kemp, the Dodgers’ star outfielder who is probably Ryan Braun’s biggest competition for the NL MVP this year, thinks that his team will be able to lure Prince Fielder over to Los Angeles this offseason. Here were his exact words:

“Every team can use another big bat, more offense would help us out. We lost a lot of one-run runs (don’t know if that’s a typo, but it’s what the quote says). One more big bat, we’d be more dangerous. Why not do it?”

To answer his question, “why not do it,” here’s the answer- your team is financially devastated.

I’m sorry, but I can’t see it happening. Sure, Fielder would be a decent fit over there, since James Loney proved his uselessness over the course of the 2011 season. But, the Dodgers aren’t even owned by a specific person or group right now, as the whole Frank McCourt episode just ended. It’s going to take time to recover form that, so I just can’t see any huge signings from the Dodgers- at least not early on this offseason.

Plus, despite the fact Fielder is friends with Kemp, Fielder has had his history of bad blood with the Dodgers. Of course, nobody can forget the time he tried to break into the Dodgers’ clubhouse a few years back after being drilled by ex-Brewer Guillermo Mota (who now pitches for the Giants). And, there was an episode earlier this year in a Spring Training game against the Dodgers, when Fielder charged the mound in defense of his teammate, McGehee.

So that’s my reasoning. I just can’t see it happening, with both the financial situation of the Dodgers, and the bad blood.

> The Brewers are going to have to look for a new radio voice to call games alongside Hall of Famer Bob Uecker. As of yesterday, Cory Provus, Uecker’s companion in the radio booth since 2009, had joined the Twins as their lead radio broadcaster.

I don’t listen to games very often on the radio, unless I don’t have access to a TV. But, I’m going to miss Provus; I thought he did a decent job with the Brewers.

Anyway, as for Uecker, who turns 77 in January, he’s already announced that he’s going to be back in the booth for the 2012 season. Which is a good thing, because I can’t imagine Brewers baseball without him, at least not yet.

> So I heard a rumor from a friend today at school about the Brewers possibly signing Jose Reyes. He said he heard about a five-year, $120 million deal.

No idea where, though. When I got home, I looked all over and couldn’t find any rumor like that anywhere.

I’m guessing he was either making it up, or heard something wrong. First off, it’s too early in the offseason to even be talking about deals of that caliber, especially with the top players in the free agent pool- I expect some of them to be out there for a month, maybe even two.

But, if this rumor does turn out to be true, I certainly wouldn’t have an issue with it.

> Anyway, that’s about all the Brewers news I’ve got. Before I go, here’s the Hot Stove news from today:

> Jim Thome is going back to the Phillies. Wow.

Thome re-joined another one of his former teams, the Indians, last year after a trade from the Twins, and now he’s going back to the Phillies. It’s going to be nostalgic for Phillies fans, obviously. But honestly, what was Ruben Amaro Jr. thinking?

Thome’s primary position has been designated hitter over the past few years. The problem? The Phillies aren’t in the AL. I don’t know what position he’s going to play, other than being a power threat from the left side off the bench. Maybe some first base with Ryan Howard out for the first few months of the season, but note that Thome has only played 28 defensive innings since 2007- and he’s 41.

But hey- they’re the Phillies. They always seem to know what their doing.

> The Orioles still can’t find a GM. Apparently there’s nobody out there willing to take on the task of bringing the term “winning” back to Baltimore. But can you blame them? It would probably take three years, maybe two at the earliest, to get that team back on track and in contention.

> The Blue Jays acquired reliever Trystan Magnuson from the Athletics earlier today. He put up a 6.14 ERA in nine Major League relief appearances this year.

And that’s all. Not much news today, but the Thome signing really caught me off guard. I’m curious to see how that turns out.


Gold Glove Awards handed out, no Brewers win

November 2, 2011

Isn’t this a surprise. The 2011 Gold Glove Awards were handed out today, and nobody on the Brewers won.

Normally, I’d try to defend the Brewers and at least attempt to make a case that someone on the team should win (which I’ll actually do for three players later in this article). But, other than those three players, I can’t make a case for any infielder on the Brewers. If I remember my stats correctly, third baseman Casey McGehee, shortstop Yuniesky Betancourt, and first baseman Prince Fielder all led the league in errors at their respective positions. I don’t think second baseman Rickie Weeks led the league in errors at second base, but I’m pretty sure he was up there.

Not to mention the outfield. Corey Hart has a cannon arm (although it isn’t always accurate), but, other than that, he looks like a fool in right field. Platoon center fielders Carlos Gomez and Nyjer Morgan each had their share of highlight reel plays, but also made costly misplays.

Then there was that awful inning in the Brewers’ last game of the postseason- game 6 of the NLCS- where the Brewers made about five errors in two plays (but were only charged for three; the error is such a pathetic stat). That pretty much closed the book for me on the Brewers’ 2011 defense, and hopefully that’s Doug Melvin’s top priority this offseason.

Anyway, now that I’m done ranting about how awful the Brewers’ defense was, here are the actual 2011 Gold Glove winners:

American League

Pitcher: Mark Buehrle, White Sox

Catcher: Matt Wieters, Orioles

First Base: Adrian Gonzalez, Red Sox

Second Base: Dustin Pedroia, Red Sox

Shortstop: Erick Aybar, Angels

Third Base: Adrian Beltre, Rangers

Outfield: Jacoby Ellsbury, Red Sox; Alex Gordon, Royals; Nick Markakis, Orioles

National League

Pitcher: Clayton Kershaw, Dodgers

Catcher: Yadier Molina, Cardinals

First Base: Joey Votto, Reds

Second Base: Brandon Phillips, Reds

Shortstop: Troy Tulowitzki, Rockies

Third Base: Placido Polanco, Phillies

Outfield: Matt Kemp, Dodgers; Andre Ethier, Dodgers; Gerardo Parra, Diamondbacks

I didn’t get to see all many of these guys play very often this year to judge how good their defense actually was, but really- Gerardo Parra over Ryan Braun? And Kershaw is pretty much a lock for the NL Cy Young Award, does he really need a Gold Glove too?

From the Brewers, I think Zack Greinke and Shaun Marcum at least deserved consideration for the Gold Glove Award at pitcher. Marcum was on the highlight reel all the time, while Greinke was just a good defender. But again, I can’t judge how good Kershaw’s defense really is, because I don’t watch “Dodgers Baseball!” (as Vin Scully would say) very often. But I never saw him on a highlight reel.

Anyway, that’s about all I’ve got for now. Before I go, here’s the Hot Stove news from today:

The Cardinals picked up and declined some options today. They picked up Molina’s option, which was expected, but they declined shortstop Rafael Furcal’s and Octavio Dotel’s options- something I didn’t expect. Maybe they intend to bring back Furcal for less money- either that, or they’re stuck with Ryan Theriot at short again, and we all know how that turned out. And Dotel was a great right-handed reliever, but he’s aging, which is probably why the Cards declined his option.

Brian Cashman is going back to what he’s done best over the past few years for the Yankees- spend as much money as possible and taunt the best players in the game to come to the Yanks. I’ve never really said this on this blog before, but I’m not a huge Cashman fan. Anyway, he’s back on three-year deal for them.

Lastly, the Cubs formally introduced Jed Hoyer as their new GM, and Jason McLeod as the head of scouting and player development. The only reason these guys are there is because of the Cubs’ new president- Theo Epstein. Together, these three created a World Series team in 2004 for the Red Sox.


La Russa finishes managerial career on top…

November 1, 2011

Even I wasn’t expecting this from the most hated man in Wisconsin.

Yes, Cardinals manager Tony La Russa, after 33 seasons as a Major League manager, has called it quits. Obviously, unless he told you in August (like he did to a few coaches), you probably weren’t expecting it, especially after he won his third career World Series title.

Now, if you’re a Brewers fan, then you, much like myself, don’t really have any respect left for this guy anymore. The last straw for me was a Brewers-Cardinals series at Miller Park in late August, in which La Russa made himself look like an idiot. First, he complained that the Brewers were manipulating the stadium lighting while the Cardinals were batting. Then, following an accidental hit-by-pitch of Albert Pujols by Takashi Saito, La Russa sent Jason Motte to the mound, only to hit Ryan Braun, then taken out of the game. After the game, La Russa said something like: “We didn’t hit him on purpose, we were just trying to send a message.” That quote pretty much put me over the top- how can a future Hall of Fame manager make himself look so stupid? I still wonder that to this day, but, enough of me bashing him- let’s get onto his astounding stats during his 33 year managerial career.

La Russa has managed just three teamsĀ  in 33 years- when you see a 33-year managerial career, you tend to think of maybe five or six different teams. But La Russa stayed with each of his three teams for an extended period of team- the White Sox (1979-1986), Athletics (1986-1995), and Cardinals (1996-2011). He didn’t have much success with the White Sox, as he only made the playoffs with them once, but he won one World Series title with the Athletics (1989) and two titles with the Cardinals (2006, 2011). He won a total of six pennants- three in the AL, three in the NL.

Anyway, despite the fact I don’t have respect left for La Russa, I can’t argue with the fact that he’s one of the greatest managers of all time.

So today was the first day of what looks like is going to be a busy offseason. Before I go, I’m just going to quickly go through all of the moves that were made today (other than La Russa retiring, we already went through that):

CC Sabathia decided not to opt out of his contract with the Yankees. Instead, he signed a one-year, $25 million contract, which is just added on to the four years already remaining on his contract. Guess he just can’t get enough money… But it’s hard to argue with, considering he’s 59-23 with a 3.18 ERA in his three season with the Yanks thus far.

The Indians picked up starter Fausto Carmona’s $7 million option. Carmona has been wildly inconsistent over the past three years, as he had a bad 2009, solid 2010, and now a bad 2011.

The Indians also declined center fielder Grady Sizemore’s $9 million option, simply because the 25-year old has been far too injury prone the past few years. But you can’t blame Cleveland for no longer wanting him after five surgeries in just three years.

Now for the last move the Indians made, and arguably the biggest- they acquired starter Derek Lowe from the Braves in exchange for a Single-A lefty, Chris Jones. Lowe is nearly out of gas, as he’s 38 and his numbers are declining- he’s coming off a 9-17/5.05 ERA year. But, the Indians just wanted him for veteran experience at the back of a young rotation that already includes young names such as Ubaldo Jimenez, Carmona, Justin Masterson, and Josh Tomlin.

Now for a few more option moves- the Royals exercised their 2012 option on closer Joakim Soria, and Cubs third baseman Aramis Ramirez declined his option with the Cubs and is now a free agent.


Pujols has historical World Series Game 3

October 23, 2011

I know I said that I’m cheering for the Rangers in the 107th World Series. But that doesn’t mean I’m not impressed by something a certain Cardinals player did today.

Some guy named Albert Pujols had a three-home run, five-hit, six RBI game today in the third game of the World Series- a 17-6 blowout Cardinals win over the Rangers. This was arguably the best World Series game of all time for a single player, as those three homers, five hits, and six RBI haven’t been done since Reggie Jackson- AKA Mr. October- did in Game 6 of the 1977 World Series.

Pujols’ first homer came in the fifth inning off flamethrowing right-hander Alexi Ogando. He gave Pujols a 96 MPH fastball practically over his head, but Pujols wasn’t having any of that- he turned on it extremely quickly and pulled it into the left field seats for a three-run blast.

The second homer came off of left-handed specialist Michael Gonzalez- note that he’s a left-handed specialist– and it was to dead center field.

The third one also came off a left-handed specialist, this time veteran Darren Oliver.

If for some reason you don’t know what a left-handed specialist is, it’s a pitcher whose primary duty is to get out tough left-handed hitters. So that’s what confuses me about this. Why did Ron Washington leave in two lefty specialists- Gonzalez and Oliver- to face the best right-handed hitter in baseball? You could see both of those home runs coming before they even happened. Anyway, I have a feeling Albert will be talking to the media tonight.

But, even though I’m cheering for the Rangers, I’m slightly relieved knowing that the Brewers aren’t the only team who can’t get Pujols out. But, the Rangers apparently figured out how to get David Freese out- something the Brewers also couldn’t do.

Anyway, almost everyone in the Cards’ lineup had hits today. Rafael Furcal had one hit, Allen Craig had a home run, Pujols- actually, just read above, Matt Holliday had a hit, Lance Berkman had a pair of hits, Freese had a pair of hits and RBI, Yadier Molina had two hits and four RBI, and Ryan Theriot had a hit. The only guy who didn’t have a hit in the Cardinals’ lineup was Jon Jay- go figure. He’s having a horrible postseason. Anyway, the Cardinals also scored at least one run off of every Rangers’ pitcher.

But the clown car had yet another long and rough task today. Kyle Lohse had a typical Kyle Lohse (or you could insert the name of any other Cards starter here) start, as he completely unraveled in the fourth inning- just as he did against the Brewers in Game 4 of the NLCS. But, the clown car picked up him, like they’ve had to do so many times this postseason. Fernando Salas, Lance Lynn, Octavio Dotel, and Mitchell Boggs gave up a combined four runs, but the 16 runs of support were enough for them.

Here’s a funny story- the St. Louis Rams think they’re giving the Cardinals good luck. Haha, good one. You can read that story about the NFL team with no wins here, but I’m not buying it.

Anyway, one more thing about the game before I go- in the seventh inning, the left fielder for the Cards- Holliday- was attempting to read a fly ball that would eventually become a sacrifice fly for the Rangers. But, as Holliday was making the catch, some Rangers fan- at least I think he was a Rangers fan- threw a white ball onto the field. I don’t know if he was attempting to hit Holliday with it, but if he was, the only guy he was embarrassing was himself- his throw went nowhere. And, to top it all off, he was escorted out of the game. Nice job.

That’s all I’ve got for now. I might make some updates later if I have time, but, if not, come back tomorrow for highlights of Game 4.


In the end, was Roenicke too friendly?

October 21, 2011

The 107th World Series is now all evened up at 1-1. The Rangers managed to snatch a win from the Cardinals today in the ninth inning, as the clown car- or bullpen, if you prefer to call it that- finally imploded for the Cards.

I’m still somewhat depressed that the Brewers aren’t playing in this series. But, as I explained in yesterday’s post, that awful defense pretty much made it impossible. Anyway, I’m not going to ramble on about the World Series for the rest of this post. That would be kind of pointless for me, considering this is a Brewers blog. Rather, I’m going to continue that post from yesterday, because I didn’t get to say everything I wanted to about how the Brewers pretty much prevented themselves from winning that series.

I started to talk about Ron Roenicke towards the end of that post, and here’s what I was going to say- he got to0 friendly with the team.

Now, I don’t mean Roenicke should start being harsh on the Brewers and scold them for every little thing (although that would still be better than what Ken Macha did). But, the manager of a team isn’t really supposed to be a friend- he’s the manager.

What I’m getting at is Roenicke’s choice for starting Shaun Marcum in Game 6- the deciding game of the Brewers’ season. Roenicke knew that Marcum was struggling- it’s hard not to notice that a guy has a 12.46 postseason ERA (going into that start). Yet, he chose to start him. And that was probably an attempt to save Marcum’s ego- which is what I mean by Roenicke being too friendly towards him.

Roenicke didn’t want Marcum to go down in Brewers’ history as the guy who flamed out during the most important part of the season. So, he tried to give him one last chance to prove himself, and it obviously didn’t go too well- one inning, four earned runs. The Brewers clearly made some threats after that, but an early four-run deficit is just usually too much to recover from.

Anyway, instead of saving Marcum’s reputation like he was trying to, Roenicke simply made the legacy worse. In my opinion, he would have been better off just leaving Marcum alone and not starting him for the rest of the postseason, because he clearly wasn’t on his game. But, now the Brewers’ season is over- and that mistake is going to loom over Roenicke for quite some time.

And he was out-managed in the NLCS by the most hated man in Wisconsin, Tony La Russa. La Russa wasn’t trying to be friendly to his starters- or any players- all season. During the regular season, he would give starting pitchers as much as 11 days rest (notably Kyle Lohse and Jaime Garcia). I guess that isn’t a very good point, but it’s definitely what Roenicke should have done in this situation. Anyway, La Russa also used his clown car at the perfect time in every game, and wasn’t afraid to be Captain Hook towards his starters. He simply managed better than Roenicke during the NLCS. Anyway, as I much as I hate La Russa, I hope Roenicke, a first-year manager, learned something from this experience.

But back to Marcum. He’s getting sort of a lot of hate right now that he doesn’t really deserve. I don’t blame Marcum for this situation at all, because, if he’s simply in a slump, he probably shouldn’t be starting in the postseason. I blame Roenicke for starting him even though he knew he was struggling.

By the way- I still refuse to compare Marcum to Jeff Suppan. That’s just an idiotic comparison, and you all know it.

Anyway, that’s all I’ve got. Feel free to leave your comments/thoughts below. And thanks for all the views lately- this site is getting more than it ever has.


Wolf comes through as Brewers even series at 2-2

October 14, 2011

This is exactly what the Brewers needed. Making a comeback after an early deficit, and a good start from someone not named Yovani Gallardo.

The Brewers defeated the Cardinals today, 4-2, in a crucial win for them. Had they lost today, the Cardinals would have needed only to win tomorrow to go to the World Series. But, with the win today, the NLCS is now evened up at 2-2- and it’s still there for anyone to take.

Randy Wolf came through right when the Brewers needed him. He went seven strong innings while giving up two runs on six hits. He also walked one and struck out six. If you compare this to Wolf’s last start- when his ERA finished at 22.50 after four innings in a start against the Diamondbacks during the NLDS- this was as good as it gets.

The Cardinals struck first yet again today. They’ve now scored the first run in every game this series. Today, the first run came from a Matt Holliday “home run”- if you can even call it that. Holliday got way under- and I mean way under- a pitch away from him, and it just stayed inside the foul pole, and barely made if over the wall. I swear, it was the luckiest home run I’ve ever seen (other than maybe Jake Westbrook’s grand slam earlier this year against the Brewers). Anyway, the second Cardinals run came on a home run by Allen Craig. At least he deserved his home run…

But the Brewers finally got some clutch hits, starting in the fourth inning. Jerry Hairston Jr. hit a RBI double to cut the deficit to 2-1, then Yuniesky Betancourt followed up with a RBI single to tie it up. The Brewers would then take the lead in the fifth on Ryan Braun’s RBI single. They scored their fourth and final run in the sixth inning when George Kottaras reached on a fielding error by second baseman Ryan Theriot, which allowed Rickie Weeks to score.

Anyway, the Brewers finished with scoreless innings from Francisco Rodriguez and John Axford. And Axford hit 99 MPH for the first time, at least that I’ve seen.

Here’s kind of a crazy stat about Cardinals pitching in this series- none of their pitchers have made it past the fifth inning, and their cumulative ERA is over 7.00. I can’t even believe they’re winning games with their pitchers not going deep. But the clown car- excuse me, the Cardinals’ bullpen- has had to do a lot of work. They got it done yesterday after Chris Carpenter’s five innings start, but couldn’t today after Kyle Lohse’s 4 1/3 inning start. It was actually Mitchell Boggs who allowed the go-ahead to Braun, but the runner was inherited from Lohse, so he still took the loss.

Tomorrow is a big game for the Brewers. If they win, they take the series lead and have the advantage to win, but same goes for the Cards if they win. Zack Greinke (16-6, 3.83 ERA) will go for the Brewers, and he’s coming off a rough start in Game 1. He allowed six runs in 6+ innings, but still took the win, thanks to nine runs of support. The Cardinals will counter with Jaime Garcia (13-7, 3.56 ERA), who also had a rough start in Game 1: he gave up six runs in four innings. But, Garcia has pitched much better at Busch Stadium than on the road this year- in fact, he has a complete game shutout against the Brewers at Busch this year.