Crew splits with Reds, loses 2 of 3 to Fish

May 12, 2016

SERIES RECAPS

> This past seven-game road trip certainly saw some high points from the Brewers, but in the end, they went just 3-4. After a discouraging start to the series in Cincinnati, the Brewers managed to escape with a split of the four-gamer, but dropped two of three to the Marlins in Miami.

> The first game of the Cincy series– a 9-5 loss– was not good. Chase Anderson’s struggles continued, as he went five innings while giving up seven runs (six earned) on six hits. Anderson desperately needed a decent start; he had gone 0-3 with a 10.12 ERA in his three games prior. However, the Reds jumped all over him early, putting up a five-run first inning followed by two more in the second. The biggest blows were Jay Bruce’s three-run blast and a two-run shot from Brandon Phillips. The Brewers eventually started to fight back in the late innings, but it was too little, too late. Alex Presley’s two-run blast knocked Alfredo Simon (7 2/3 IP, 7 H, 3 ER, 1 BB, 5 K) out of the game, and then Chris Carter hit a missile of a solo shot in the ninth.

The second game wasn’t much better. The Reds knocked around Tyler Cravy, who was making a spot start for Wily Peralta while he was on paternity leave. Cravy struggled in his four innings of work, allowing five runs on six hits while walking two and striking out four. Joey Votto and Phillips both had home runs off Cravy while Adam Duvall hit an RBI double. Rookie starter Tim Adleman was good for the Reds, holding the Brewers to a run on four hits over five innings. He walked three and struck out four; the only damage against Adleman was Presley’s second home run of the series. Also notable in this game was the Reds snapping a streak of 24 games in which their bullpen had allowed at least a run.

Things turned around for the Brewers in the third game, as they won 13-7 in 10 innings. Jimmy Nelson (5.0 IP, 8 H, 6 R, 5 ER, 1 BB, 5 K) got knocked around, and the Brewers found themselves down 6-2 heading into the sixth inning. However, a three-run sixth that included a solo homer from Jonathan Lucroy and an Aaron Hill two-run shot pulled them within one. Hill then tied the game in the eighth on his second home run of the game. The Brewers managed to send the game to extras, and they broke the game open in the tenth inning. Ryan Braun, Lucroy, and Carter hit consecutive singles to load the bases with no outs, and then Hill came up and slugged his third home run of the game in the form of a go-ahead grand slam. The Brewers didn’t stop there, as Jonathan Villar hit a bases-clearing double later in the inning to put the Reds away.

The fourth game, a 5-4 Brewers win, was another great comeback. Milwaukee struck first on Braun’s solo shot in the first inning, but then the Reds got to Junior Guerra (6.0 IP, 4 H, 4 ER, 2 BB, 6 K) in the third as Tyler Holt, Ivan De Jesus Jr., and Votto all had RBI hits. Duvall then hit a home run in the fourth to extend Cincinnati’s lead to 4-1. However, the Brewers would slowly chip away over the next few innings to eventually regain the lead. Hernan Perez hit a solo shot in the fifth, Lucroy had an RBI double in the sixth, Villar had an RBI groundout in the seventh to tie the game, and then Lucroy hit a go-ahead solo home run in the eighth.

> The Miami series did not go as well. Milwaukee’s lineup was torn to shreds by Jose Fernandez in the first game; the Marlins’ ace fired seven shutout innings while giving up just four hits. He walked four and struck out 11. The only Brewers run came when Bryan Morris walked Domingo Santana with the bases loaded in the ninth. Peralta started for the Brewers, and wasn’t as terrible as he usually has been this season: he went six innings while giving up two runs on 10 hits. He walked two and struck out four. Peralta should have actually had one more run on his line, but he got lucky in the second inning. J.T. Realmuto hit what should have been a two-run home run, but he “passed” Marcell Ozuna on the basepaths and was called out; he was credited with an RBI single instead of a home run. It actually appeared to be Ozuna’s fault, as he was a few feet off first base waiting to see if the ball would be caught. Then, after Realmuto had already rounded first, Ozuna ran back to first, for whatever reason, as if he was getting ready to tag and take second base. It wound up not costing the Marlins anything, but it was still inattentive baserunning on Ozuna’s part.

The Brewers won the second game handily, 10-2. Zach Davies finally won his first game of the year, going five innings while giving up two runs on five hits. He walked three and struck out one. The only damage against Davies came on Realmuto’s RBI double in the second inning and an RBI single from Ozuna in the third. Milwaukee didn’t hit any home runs, but a majority of the lineup had great days at the plate. Villar went 2-for-6 with two RBIs, Perez was 2-for-3, Braun 2-for-4 with two RBIs, Hill 3-for-4 with two RBIs, and Presley 2-for-5. Adam Conley (4.0 IP, 7 H, 4 ER, 2 BB, 4 K) took the loss for the Fish, as he was not nearly as effective as he was at Miller Park a few weeks ago when he tossed 7 2/3 hitless innings.

The rubber game was a disappointing one for the Crew, as they lost 3-2. Anderson (6.0 IP, 3 H, 3 ER, 1 BB, 4 K) finally rebounded and posted a quality start, but he fell to a dominant Wei-Yin Chen, who struck out 12 Brewers. Anderson was stellar aside from a bad fifth inning, when he gave up a two-run homer to rising Brewer-killer Justin Bour and an Adeiny Hechavarria sacrifice fly. The only damage the Brewers could manage against Chen was a Villar RBI groundout and Braun’s RBI single, both of which came in the seventh.

NEWS

> The Brewers reinstated Scooter Gennett from the 15-day disabled list today. He had been dealing with right oblique tightness when he was placed on the DL in late April. Gennett should be a boost to the lineup, as even though he’s hit just .258 on the season, he had four home runs and a .361 on-base percentage through 18 games.

In a corresponding move, Milwaukee optioned infielder Yadiel Rivera to Triple-A Colorado Springs. Rivera had some good games here and there for the Crew, but overall was hitting just .196. It was clear that he lost his job as utility man to Perez, who has hit .276 since being recalled after Gennett was placed on the DL.

> Lefty Sam Freeman accepted his outright assignment to Triple-A.

> MLB Pipeline announced its top 30 prospects for each team, the first prospect list update of the 2016 season. Here is the Brewers’ top 30, which hasn’t changed much:

  1. Orlando Arcia, SS
  2. Brett Phillips, OF
  3. Jorge Lopez, SP (RHP)
  4. Josh Hader, SP (LHP)
  5. Trent Clark, OF
  6. Gilbert Lara, SS
  7. Kodi Medeiros, SP (LHP)
  8. Cody Ponce, SP (RHP)
  9. Devin Williams, SP (RHP)
  10. Jacob Nottingham, C
  11. Isan Diaz, SS/2B
  12. Tyrone Taylor, OF
  13. Clint Coulter, OF
  14. Demi Orimoloye, OF
  15. Monte Harrison, OF
  16. Nathan Kirby, SP (LHP)
  17. Adrian Houser, SP (RHP)
  18. Michael Reed, OF
  19. Marcos Diplan, SP (RHP)
  20. Bubba Derby, SP (RHP)
  21. Taylor Williams, SP (RHP)
  22. Yadiel Rivera, SS
  23. Jake Gatewood, 3B
  24. Rymer Liriano, OF
  25. Victor Roache, OF
  26. Freddy Peralta, SP (RHP)
  27. Miguel Diaz, SP (RHP)
  28. Damien Magnifico, RP (RHP)
  29. Jacob Barnes, RP (RHP)
  30. Brandon Woodruff, SP (RHP)

STATS

> After a slow start, Hill has found his stroke recently. Over his last 15 games, he’s hit .333 with three home runs (all of which came in the same game) and 11 RBIs.

> Nationals starter Max Scherzer struck out 20 in a start against the Tigers last night, tying the Major League record for strikeouts in a nine-inning game. The only others to accomplish this feat are Roger Clemens, Randy Johnson, and Kerry Wood.

> Mets starter Bartolo Colon hit his first big league home run the other night, and it was hilarious. I think the best part was that his home run trot took 31.1 seconds.

> The Brewers start a four-game set at home against the Padres tonight. Nelson (4-2, 3.74 ERA) will take on James Shields (1-5, 3.60 ERA). Milwaukee is the only team Shields has never faced in his big league career. Nelson is 1-1 with a 1.54 ERA in two career starts against San Diego.

Guerra (1-0, 6.00 ERA), Peralta (2-4, 6.75 ERA), and Davies (1-3, 6.29 ERA) will start the other three games of the series, while the Padres have yet to announce the order of their rotation.


Game of endurance goes in Brewers’ favor

September 8, 2012

POSTGAME

> Last night may have been the biggest win of the season for the Brewers up to this point. After a two and a half hour rain delay and a four and a half hour game, they came out on top against the Cardinals in 13 innings, 5-4.

Since Yovani Gallardo was getting the ball, I’m pretty sure all Brewer fans were bracing themselves for the worst. Yo is terrible against the Cards in his career, with a 1-9, 7.05 ERA mark against them going in. And he got off to a bad start, as the Cardinals jumped on him for two in the first inning on an RBI double from Matt Carpenter and a sacrifice fly from Allen Craig. After that, though, Gallardo held serve against the team he’s struggled so much against, going six innings while giving up just those two runs. He struck out six and walked none.

The first Brewers run didn’t come until the fourth inning on Taylor Green’s RBI groundout. Other than that, Kyle Lohse didn’t show many signs of breaking, until the seventh inning. He walked Martin Maldonado and gave up a single to Jeff Bianchi, which prompted Mike Matheny to remove Lohse in favor of Edward Mujica. Mujica gave up what looked like a routine line out from Travis Ishikawa, but right fielder Carlos Beltran misplayed it and let the ball get past him. Ishikawa was given an RBI double.

The Brewers then took the lead in the eighth. Carlos Gomez hit what would have been an infield single anyway, but shortstop Daniel Descalso threw the ball away, allowing Corey Hart to score from second base. After Gomez advanced to second on a stolen base, Maldonado came through with an RBI single to give the Brewers a 4-2 lead.

But this was far from over. Jim Henderson walked the lead-0ff man in the eighth, like he always seems to do. Then, after recording two outs, he gave up a game-tying home run to Yadier Molina.

The next run didn’t come until the 13th inning, when Braun dealt the Cards their finishing blow with a go-ahead solo shot off Lance Lynn. John Axford came on to nail down the save for a game that ended at 2:05 A.M. CT. Yes, you read that correctly.

[EM’s coverage]

THE NEWS

> Green got the start in place of Aramis Ramirez, who’s still out with an oblique strain/bad back.

But here’s Green’s side of the story. He drove from Nashville to his home in Vancouver (God knows why), only to get the call from the Brewers after he got there. Apparently he lives four hours from the airport, so he had to make that drive, then make the four and a half hour flight to St. Louis so he could be in the starting lineup. Tack on the rain delay and 13 inning game, and Green had himself quite a day.

> Ramirez hopes to return to the lineup for tonight’s game.

> MLB.com re-ranked their top 100 prospects and each team’s top 20 following the September call-ups. Here are the Brewers’ top 20:

1. Jean Segura, SS
2. Tyler Thornburg, SP

3. Taylor Jungmann, SP
4. Jed Bradley, SP
5. Wily Peralta, SP
6. Johnny Hellweg, SP
7. Scooter Gennett, 2B
8. Hunter Morris, 1B
9. Logan Schafer, OF
10. Jimmy Nelson, SP
11. Clint Coulter, C
12. Kentrail Davis, OF
13. Ariel Pena, SP
14. Drew Gagnon, SP
15. Victor Roache, OF
16. Caleb Gindl, OF
17. David Goforth, SP
18. Yadiel Rivera, SS
19. Khris Davis, OF
20. Jorge Lopez, SP/RP

THE NUMBERS

> Brandon Kintzler got his second big league win after pitching a scoreless 12th. His first win in the Majors also came in an extra inning game.

> Beltran’s average has fallen all the way to .261.

> Tonight’s match-up:

Mike Fiers (8-7, 3.11 ERA) vs. Jake Westbrook (13-10, 3.93 ERA)


Brewers avoid utter embarrassment

August 12, 2012

POSTGAME

> A sweep at the hands of the Astros would have made the Brewers truly hit rock bottom. But, they were able to avoid a sweep by the worst team in baseball, defeating the Astros 5-3.

Yovani Gallardo was able to go deep into the game, throwing 7 2/3 solid innings while giving up three runs on nine hits. He walked two and struck out eight. It was his longest outing of the year, and the second most pitches he’d thrown (114). Jose Veras came in to get the last out of what could have been a rocky eighth inning, then Kameron Loe recorded the save in the ninth (which was also pretty shaky).

Gallardo had a rough first inning, giving up back-t0-back doubles to Tyler Greene and Marwin Gonzalez to start the game. But, Gallardo himself tied the game with an RBI single in the second inning. Rickie Weeks gave the Brewers the lead with an RBI fielder’s choice in the fifth inning, and Ryan Braun followed that up with an RBI groundout to make the score 3-1. Gonzalez’s RBI groundout in the bottom of the inning cut into the Brewers’ lead, but Corey Hart added an insurance run in the sixth on 22nd home run of the year. The Brewers added another important run in the eighth on Martin Maldonado’s RBI double. The last Astros run came on Scott Moore’s RBI single in the eighth.

THE ROTATION SITUATION

> The other day, Ron Roenicke announced that the Brewers might start monitoring pitch count and the number of innings that pitchers throw, also mentioning that a few could even be shut down. If you don’t already know, I’m strongly against pitch count and the emphasis it has on today’s game of baseball, so naturally I’m opposed to this idea. But let me explain why I think it’s useless.

The only name Roenicke mentioned as to who would probably shut down is Mike Fiers, who is by far the best pitcher in the Brewers’ rotation right now. His 1.80 ERA makes him a legitimate Rookie of the Year candidate. So why even think about shutting him down?

According to Roenicke, the Brewers want to “protect his arm.” After an eight-inning performance his last time out, Fiers is at 80 innings on the year (excluding 55 innings in the Minors). If you add those together, he’s at a total of 135 innings, and Fiers has never thrown more than 135 innings, which is RRR’s excuse to possibly shut him down.

And that’s what I don’t understand. Not letting a young a guy throw more innings than he has before isn’t going to help him develop. He has to get out of his comfort zone and throw more innings; he’s in the Majors now.

I do understand trying to protect his arm, but that’s pretty pointless, considering Fiers doesn’t have much injury history. For a guy like Mark Rogers, who has a ton of injuries on his ledger, sure, I can cope with not letting him throw as many innings until we know he’s back to 100%. But Fiers is at 100% right now, and is doing some of the best pitching the Brewers have seen in quite some time. So why take that away?

Roenicke has also suggested going to a six-man rotation, which would also hold back the innings of each pitcher. I’m not for that, either, but at least the guys would continue to pitch, instead of being shut down for the year. If I had to choose between the two, I’d go with the six-man rotation.

RRR also tried to compare this to what the Rockies are doing. Please, our pitching staff isn’t that bad. (Unless we’re talking about the bullpen, which we aren’t.)

THE NEWS

> Weeks was tried again at the top of the order, a role he lost earlier this year after his awful start. He went 0-for-4 with two strikeouts, so I doubt we’ll see him there tomorrow.

> Two former Brewers took the mound today. Chris Capuano took a no-hit bid into the seventh inning against the Marlins before it was broken up by Jose Reyes. Ben Sheets will try to continue his astounding comeback tonight against the Mets, which will be broadcasted on ESPN.

> The Cubs picked up former Brewers starter Seth McClung today, signing him to a Minor League deal. The Brewers tried McClung again this year in the Minors, but just couldn’t control the damage, so he was released two weeks ago.

The Cubs have already tried something similar to this. Last year, they signed former Brewer Doug Davis to a Minor League deal, and he eventually reached the Majors. But that experiment didn’t work out too well, and I doubt McClung will either.

> One of the Brewers’ first round picks in this year’s draft, Victor Roache, was cleared to take dry swings today. He’d been out for over four months due to major arm surgery.

THE NUMBERS GAME

> Jean Segura continues to improve at the plate, as he went 2-for-4 today. His average is up to .250.

> Hart’s home run today snapped him out of an o-for-11 slump.

> This was Gallardo’s third consecutive start in which he himself picked up an RBI.

> Loe’s save was just the third of his career.

> Probables for the upcoming series in Colorado:

Mike Fiers (6-4, 1.80 ERA) vs. Jeff Francis (3-4, 6.06 ERA)

Randy Wolf (3-8, 5.46 ERA) vs. Tyler Chatwood (2-2, 5.06 ERA)

Mark Rogers (0-1, 4.08 ERA) vs. Drew Pomeranz (1-7, 5.07 ERA)

THE EXTRAS

> This play may have been the Brewers’ play of the year, and sparks some excitement for the Segura/Weeks double play tandem.

> Hart technically had the only Brewers home run this series, but Mike Vassallo might disagree with that.


Brewers cruise after Maldonado’s homer

June 9, 2012

> You can’t blame Martin Maldonado for only hitting .214 right now. He was thrown into a fire that he probably wasn’t ready for: being a starting catcher in the Majors. Defensively, he’s handled himself well, but is still finding his way with the bat. Maldonado was never known as an offensive catcher until last year, when he broke out for a .321 average in Triple-A. But still, he was forced into the situation thanks to- technically- Jonathan Lucroy’s wife. Anyway, just as it took Lucroy a while to get used to hitting in the Majors back after his call-up in 2010, it’s taking Maldonado a while as well.

> But Maldonado took a big step forward offensively today in the Brewers’ 9-5 win over the Padres. His home run in the fourth was the decisive blow in the slugfest, and gave the Brewers a lead they wouldn’t again relinquish. But Maldonado wasn’t the only offensive story tonight. Corey Hart had yet another multi-home run game- two solo shots, both off of Pads starter Edinson Volquez (who the Brewers have a history of hammering from his days with the Reds).

Shaun Marcum didn’t have his prettiest start of the year, but it was good enough tonight. He went 5 2/3 innings while giving up three runs on six hits. He also walked three and struck out six for his fifth win of the year.

The Brewers got on the board immediately in the first on Hart’s first home run of the game, which was a leadoff shot. But, in the third, Everth Cabrera hit an inside-the-park home run, courtesy of a misplay by center fielder Carlos Gomez. The Padres then took the lead in the fourth, thanks to a bases-loaded walk to Cabrera by Marcum.

But then came Maldonado’s big blow. In the Brewers’ fourth, Maldonado hit a go-ahead three-run shot to make the score 4-2. This was by far his biggest moment as a Major Leaguer so far.

In the fifth, the Brewers tacked on two more runs on Hart’s second homer of the game, then an Aramis Ramirez RBI groundout. The Padres then got one run back on Cameron Maybin’s solo home to make it 6-3. But, in the seventh, the Brewers extended their lead even more, first on a Rickie Weeks sacrifice fly. Then, Taylor Green hit his second career home run, a two-run blast.

The Padres got two more runs in the ninth on Logan Forsythe’s two-RBI triple, but it wasn’t near enough to start a rally.

> Here’s an interesting (and encouraging) fact. The last Brewer to hit his first two career home runs in pinch-hit appearances was Prince Fielder. We all saw what kind of career he had in Milwaukee before joining the Tigers before free agency, and it was one heck of a run. But the reason I bring this up is because Green’s first two home runs have come under the same circumstances: both were in pinch-hit appearances. Obviously, other than those two home runs, Green has shown the potential to be a utility guy who comes through every so often, at least in the Majors. But we have to remember he was an extreme power hitter in the Minors, with 36 home runs and a .336 batting average in Triple-A last year. So he could be hitting his stride after a few months in the Majors, and I’m just saying- he and Fielder had similar starts.

> The Brewers have successfully signed their top two Draft picks from a few days ago. They signed their first pick (27th overall), power-hitting catcher Clint Coulter, with a $1.675 million bonus. Power-hitting (but injury-prone) outfielder Victor Roache, their second pick (28th overall), signed with a $1.525 bonus.

Anyway, I might do a more in-depth analysis of these guys sometime next week.

> And that’s about it. The Brewers will play the second game of this series tomorrow at 3:10 PM CT. They’ll send Michael Fiers (1-1, 3.75 ERA) to the mound for his third career start. He’s had mixed results in his first two: he dominated the Dodgers in LA last week, but lost to the Pirates after serving up back-to-back long balls in the fifth.

The Padres will counter with ex-Cub Andrew Cashner, who the Brewers have seen a bit of out of the Chicago bullpen. Cashner was used out of the bullpen by the Padres earlier this season, and put up a 3.81 ERA. This is his first start of the season.

Anyway, I’ll probably add the box score tomorrow. But for now, thanks for reading, and feel free to leave your thoughts.


Greinke K’s 12 as Brewers return favor to Cubs

June 7, 2012

> After how terrible last night’s game turned out, today’s game was unbelievable.

> A day after being embarrassingly shut out 10-0 by one of the worst teams in the National League, the Brewers came back and defeated the Cubs, 8-0. The story of the night was Zack Greinke, who, you could argue, had the best start of his Brewers tenure. The Brewers’ offense also broke out for five runs against Cubs starter Paul Maholm to show that it hasn’t completely disappeared yet.

But first I’ll talk about Greinke’s gem. He went seven innings while giving up just two hits. He walked two and struck out 12, a new Brewers-high for him. Like I said, you could make the argument that this was the best stuff he’s ever had as a Brewer, but there was also his eight inning of two-hit ball against the Reds back at the beginning of May. He struck out 11 in that start. But Greinke once again continued his home dominance, improving to 15-0 at Miller Park.

The Brewers got on the board first in the fourth inning on Ryan Braun’s RBI single. Cody Ransom followed that with an RBI double. Then, Brooks Conrad, who has acquired a batting average since I last posted, hit a broken bat two-RBI single to cap off a four-run fourth inning. The Brewers also tacked on another run in the fifth on a Corey Hart sacrifice fly.

In the bottom of the eighth, Taylor Green was pinch-hitting for the pitcher’s spot in the lineup, and it paid off. He hit his first career home run- a three-run shot- off of Carlos Marmol, who hung him a slider. That pretty much finished off the Brewers’ blowout of the Cubs; nearly the exact opposite of what happened last night.

> The 2012 First-Year Player Draft came to a close today. The highlights of the Brewers’ picks came in the first round and the compensation round. They took catcher Clint Coulter as the 27th pick overall, outfielder Victor Roache as 28th overall, and outfielder Mitch Haniger in the compensation round. All three of these guys are considered big bats, and that was the Brewers’ focus this draft. After snatching up good pitching in last year’s draft (Taylor Jungmann and Jed Bradley), they wanted to replenish their Minor League system, which is lacking consistent power hitters at the moment.

Another highlight was that the Brewers took manager Ron Roenicke’s son, outfielder Lance Roenicke, in the draft. But that was a common theme in the NL Central: the Cardinals took Mike Matheny’s son, and the Cubs took ex-Brewers hitting coach Dale Sveum’s son.

> Other than that, there wasn’t much news today. But, school officially finished for me today, which means I’ll be able to get back to posting here on BW a lot more consistently. Even since school started back in September I’ve been pretty on and off as far as posting goes, but I’m going to try and post every day throughout the summer.

> And that’s about it. The Brewers will play the rubber game of this series tomorrow at 1:10 PM CT. They’ll send Randy Wolf (2-5, 6.05 ERA) to the mound, and he’s having the definition of a terrible season. But, one of his best starts of the season came against the Cubs back in May: six shutout innings.

The Cubs will counter with Matt Garza (2-4, 4.10 ERA), who the Brewers have struggled a lot against recently. But Garza has had his own struggles as of late, with his ERA ballooning up over 4.00 in his past few starts.

> Anyway, thanks for reading, and feel free to leave your thoughts.