Brewers return empty-handed

December 8, 2012

> This year’s edition of the Winter Meetings were a disappointment for the Brewers, to say the least. They offered deals to a few of their targets, including Ryan Dempster, Jason Grilli, and Sean Burnett, but all of them were rejected. Burnett ended up signing with the Angels because they offered him much more cash the Brewers. Grilli hasn’t signed yet, but the Brewers haven’t been in contact with him for over a week for some reason, so he’s off the table. Dempster is still out there, but is holding out for a three-year deal. So far, the parties interested in Dempster- the Brewers, Red Sox, and Royals- have offered him two-year deals, but have been hesitant to add on that third year because of his age.

So that’s about the gist of what happened- rather, what didn’t happen- at the Meetings.

> The Brewers did make a move today, however, signing left-hander Travis Webb to a minor league deal with an invitation to Spring Training.

Webb has spent his entire career with the Reds’ minor league affiliates, never making it to the Majors. He has a career ERA of 4.13 in the minors, but went a sub-par 2-6 with a 4.81 ERA in 2012 at Triple-A. Webb was a starter at the beginning of his professional career, but has since converted into a reliever.

> Doug Melvin said that the Brewers aren’t in on Brian Wilson. We can all take a sigh of relief now.

> Minor moves: 

Rays: Signed Jason Bourgeois to a minor league deal.
Astros: Took Josh Fields from the Red Sox in the Rule 5 Draft; took Nate Freiman from the Padres in the Rule 5 Draft; claimed Mickey Storey off waivers from the Yankees.
Cubs: Took Hector Rondon from the Indians in the Rule 5 Draft; re-signed Ian Stewart to a one-year deal.
Rockies: Took Danny Rosenbaum from the Nationals in the Rule 5 Draft; signed Justin Berg, Hernan Iribarren, Jeff Manship, Gustavo Molina, and Henry Wrigley to minor league deals.
Twins: Took Ryan Pressly from the Red Sox in the Rule 5 Draft; acquired Vance Worley and Trevor May from the Phillies; re-signed Jared Burton to a two-year deal.
Indians: Took Chris McGuiness from the Rangers in the Rule 5 Draft.
Marlins: Took Alfredo Silverio from the Dodgers in the Rule 5 Draft; took Braulio Lara from the Rays in the Rule 5 Draft.
Red Sox: Took Jeff Kobernus from the Nationals in the Rule 5 Draft; acquired Justin Henry from the Tigers; acquired Kyle Kaminska from the Pirates; signed Koji Uehara to a one-year deal; acquired Graham Godfrey from the Athletics.
Mets: Took Kyle Lobstein from the Rays in the Rule 5 Draft.
Diamondbacks: Took Starling Peralta from the Cubs in the Rule 5 Draft; signed Brandon McCarthy to a two-year deal.
Phillies: Took Ender Inciarte from the Diamondbacks in the Rule 5 Draft; acquired Ben Revere from the Twins.
White Sox: Took Angel Sanchez from the Angels in the Rule 5 Draft.
Orioles: Took T.J. McFarland from the Indians in the Rule 5 Draft.
Rangers: Took Coty Woods from the Rockies in the Rule 5 Draft; signed Randy Wells, Evan Meek, Brandon Allen, and Jake Brigham to minor league deals.
Padres: Acquired Wilfredo Boscan from the Rangers.
Braves: Re-signed Reed Johnson to a one-year deal.
Yankees: Re-signed Brett Gardner to a one-year deal; outrighted Jayson Nix to Triple-A.
Reds: Re-signed Ryan Ludwick to a two-year deal.

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Braun is officially back

August 18, 2012

POSTGAME

> The Brewers took the series from the Phillies today, defeating them 6-2. The stars of the show tonight were Yovani Gallardo, who is showing he’s become quite the second-half pitcher, and Ryan Braun, officially out of his slump.

Gallardo dominated a pretty depleted Philly lineup, going seven inning while giving up a run on four hits. He walked two and struck out nine. He won his fourth consecutive start, bring his season record to 12-8.

Down 1-0 in the fourth, the Brewers posted a two-out explosion against Vance Worley. After Corey Hart hit a single and Martin Maldonado walked, Nyjer Morgan hit a triple that bounced off of right fielder Dominic Brown’s glove. That gave the Brewers the lead. Worley then opted to walk Jean Segura so he could get to Gallardo’s spot in the lineup, but Yo made him pay with a two-run single.

In the sixth inning, Braun hit his third home run- a two-run shot- over the past two games. Looks like the off-day and early batting practice is still paying off.

The Phillies’ last run came on a Kevin Frandsen RBI single in the ninth.

THE NEWS

> Shaun Marcum will make one more start for the Class A Timber Rattlers. He’ll throw 75 pitches, then hopefully return to the Brewers’ rotation, assuming all goes well.

> The Nationals designated Cesar Izturis for assignment today. That’s the second former Brewer shortstop DFA’d this week.

> The Cubs are working on an extension with Starlin Castro.

> Prince Fielder belted two home runs to give the Tigers the win over the O’s today. Looks like he’s starting to figure out Comerica Park.

THE NUMBERS

> Gallardo is now 3-0 with a 1.74 ERA against the Phillies in his career. I have a strong hatred towards the Phillies, so I love that.

> Aramis Ramirez went a dismal 0-f0r-5 with three strikeouts in today’s game.

> It’s worth noting that tomorrow’s starter for the Phils, Cole Hamels, is coming off two consecutive shutouts. Hamels also threw a complete game against the Brewers last year.

> Tomorrow’s match-up:

Cole Hamels (13-6, 2.91 ERA) vs. Mike Fiers (2.63 ERA)

> Sorry about tonight’s short article. I started late and don’t have much time on my hands. Everything here at BWI is kind of scattered right now (you can probably tell by the current setup of the site), but I’m hoping to get everything organized within the next few weeks.


Lindblom does Hart a favor

August 17, 2012

POSTGAME

> The Brewers had to have been happy to finally get out of Coors Field, and they showed it with their 7-4 win over the Phillies- at home. The story of the night was Corey Hart, whose go-ahead grand slam in the eighth inning pretty much sealed the win.

Cliff Lee was on the mound for the Phils, and he got off to a very rough start. He gave up back-to-back solo home runs to Ryan Braun and Aramis Ramirez in the first inning, giving the Brewers the early 2-0 advantage. Lee would surrender another home run to Braun in the fourth inning. After that, though, the former Cy Young Award winner buckled down and ended up going 7 2/3 innings with 12 strikeouts.

Going into the fifth inning, the Brewers had a 3-1 lead, but Marco Estrada loaded the bases with two outs. Estrada had his typical blow-up inning that he absolutely has to have at some point each game, and Kevin Frandsen hit a go-ahead, bases-clearing double.

Fast forward to the eighth inning, with the score staying 4-3. Lee got two quick outs to start it, striking out Martin Maldonado and inducing a Norichika Aoki pop-out. But, the third baseman Frandsen botched what should have been an inning-ending groundout and let Rickie Weeks reach second on the error. Charlie Manuel decided to go to his setup man, Josh Lindblom (who, keep in mind, has struggled during his short time in Philly).

Lindblom came on and loaded the bases with an intentional walk to Braun, then an unintentional (but probably intentional) walk to Ramirez. That brought Hart to the plate, who hit his opposite-field grand slam just over Dominic Brown’s glove.

There was a bit of ninth inning drama, as Manny Parra allowed two hits to start it. But Jim Henderson came on and rebounded from his rough outing yesterday, recording his third save of the year.

MY QUESTION TO LINDBLOM

> If you watch every Brewer game, you probably know that Hart can’t touch the low-and-outside pitch- the slider in particular. None of the Brewers can really hit it, and the problem is they can’t lay off it. Hart is probably the worst at laying off it.

Anyway, after Lindblom walked Ramirez, I thought the inning was over. All Lindblom had to do was throw Hart three sliders just a little off the outside corner and low, and Hart would swing right through it, as usual. But maybe Lindblom misread the scouting report.

Lindblom did give Hart a few sliders, none of which were high enough in the zone for Hart to chase at. But, on a 2-2 count, Lindblom gave Hart a fastball up in the zone that cut home plate in half, and we know Hart didn’t miss it.

And that’s what I don’t get. On a 2-2 count, why on earth would you give Hart a fastball? There’s still a pitch to screw around with. I guess there’s the danger of bringing the count full, then the pressure of throwing a strike, or else the game is tied. But the odds of Hart eventually swinging at the slider are good, as he’s shown us.

Or we could ask Manuel a question. Why not just bring in Jonathan Papelbon for a four-out save? I highly doubt Papelbon would come in, walk two batters, then give up a go-ahead slam. Papelbon is elite; Lindblom is a struggling reliever that Philadelphia probably already despises. There’s a better chance Papelbon gets through the heart of the Brewers’ order.

I’m not complaining here, but maybe now we know why the Phillies are having as bad of a season as the Brewers.

THE NEWS

> In the middle of his slump, Braun decided to take early batting practice for the first time since he was a rookie (or so he says). I think it worked.

> Shaun Marcum is scheduled for a bullpen session tomorrow. If that goes well, we’ll probably see him back in uniform next week.

> You can also check out my latest article at Reviewing the Brew here. I talk about Marcum, his constant injuries, and his free agent status come this offseason.

THE NUMBERS

> The Brewers’ bullpen didn’t give up a run tonight. And we won. Coincidence?

> After his slump, Braun stormed back, hitting two home runs off Lee. His average also rose to .302 after having fallen below .300 on Tuesday.

> Braun has three home runs in his career against Lee, all coming this year. Oh, and he’s batting .533 against the lefty.

> Tomorrow’s match-up:

Vance Worley (6-7, 3.97 ERA) vs. Yovani Gallardo (11-8, 3.78 ERA)


Fiers’ solid start spoiled by Brewers’ offense

July 22, 2012

> This has certainly become a recurring theme over the past few days. The Brewers once again fell to the Reds today, 2-1. That score should tell you what went wrong for the Brewers, and what has gone wrong this entire series: no offense. Thanks to this lack of offense, the Brewers have managed to sweep themselves out of contention for the National League Central, as they now sit 10.5 games back in the division. This season is starting to feel very 2010-ish.

More on that later, but for now here’s the game summary. Aramis Ramirez hit an RBI single in the third inning to give the Brewers a 1-0 lead, but the Reds answered back with two of their own in the bottom of the inning on Wilson Valdez’s RBI single and Brandon Phillips’ sacrifice fly. And that’s your game summary.

Michael (or Mike, still debating on what to call him) Fiers had yet another stellar start today. He went six innings while giving up two runs (one earned) on five hits. He didn’t walk a batter and struck out four. He lowered his ERA to 1.96 on the year, which leads the Majors in rookie starter ERA. But, courtesy of this so-called “offense,” his record stands at a mediocre 3-4. That’s all due to no-decisions and hard-luck losses.

> I said earlier that this season is starting to feel a lot like 2010. Just like that season, the Brewers went into a season-deciding series against the Reds with a chance to make up some ground. Instead, they lost the series (in this case, were swept), and buried themselves into the bottom of the NL Central with no hope of getting out.

But, unlike 2010, it isn’t the starting pitching’s fault. The starting pitching has been great again this year like it was in 2011, despite some injuries. In fact, it’s the exact opposite of the issue we had in 2010: it’s the offense.

Which is odd. If you look up and down the lineup, there is some talent. Norichika Aoki, Ryan Braun, Ramirez, Corey Hart, and Rickie Weeks are all names that should be productive. But it feels like none of them are; otherwise I don’t have an answer as to why the offense is slumping so horribly.

It’s not that Aoki isn’t producing. But it’s worth noting that his average has dropped from around .300 to .285 in recent days (though he did go 2-for-5 today).

Braun is having another banner year, but did have a pretty terrible series in Cincinnati. He struck out six times- three of those coming today- and his average dropped to .309 (not that it’s a bad average, but it was higher coming into the series). He also left four runners on base today.

Ramirez is the one guy who is producing right now. He went 2-for-4 today, and he’s brought his average up to .277, the highest it’s been all year. But, without guys getting on ahead of him (I should also mention the two-spot in the lineup is a gaping hole), how can he drive in the runs that he’s supposed to be driving in?

Hart has been a streaky hitter his entire career; I’ll give him that. But, he’s been mired in his bad streaks at the wrong times this year, especially with no one else around him producing. His average currently sits at .258 (it’s been flying up and down between .240 and .270 like it always does), which doesn’t give Ramirez much protection.

Then there’s Weeks. Everyone was going crazy when he finally heated up after the All-Star break and brought his average over .200 (there’s definitely an issue when people are getting excited about that), but now he’s falling back down. His average sits at .195, and he’s still on pace to have arguably the worst year of his career.

Those are the core five guys who need to be producing- getting on base, driving in runs, etc.- in order for the Brewers to win. And they aren’t doing that, especially right now. You could make a case that Martin Maldonado, who has brought his average all the way up to .280, should be in that group of core players. And I suppose I’d agree with that, considering he’s performing better than half of them anyway. But he has the same problem Ramirez is having: no one is getting on base for him to drive in.

Anyway, I’ll be done with that tangent, which was basically me trying to explain what’s wrong with the offense. I’m aware a bunch of things don’t add up- I’m just about as confused as the rest of you.

> On a somewhat positive note (it’s been tough to stay positive through this disappointment of a season), John Axford hasn’t given up a run in three appearances since he was removed from the closer’s role, which is a good sign. There was always the danger of him coming in and giving up a run or more before his removal, so it’s nice to see him string together a couple scoreless appearances.

> The Brewers have reached an agreement to sign pitching prospect Yosmer Leal. He’s a 16-year old out of Venezuela who probably will not see big league time with the Brewers any time soon, but it’s always good to stack up young pitchers.

> And that’s about it. The Brewers travel to Philadelphia tomorrow to start a three-game series with the Phillies. But no worries there: the Phillies are having a worse season than the Brewers, if you can believe that. They’ll see Roy Halladay tomorrow, then Cliff Lee and Vance Worley. At first glance that seems like a tough lineup of pitchers, but none of them are having very good seasons up to this point.

Anyway, thanks for reading.


Recap of all major awards

November 23, 2011

> Yesterday, the NL MVP was handed out. This marked the last major award of the offseason. And I’m proud to say that, for the first time ever, I got all of my predictions right. Not that I agreed with all of them, but they were probably the most logical choice fore each award.

> Anyway, here are the top finishers for each award (courtesy of Baseball Reference):

AL MVP

1. Justin Verlander, Tigers

2. Jacoby Ellsbury, Red Sox

3. Jose Bautista, Blue Jays

4. Curtis Granderson, Yankees

5. Miguel Cabrera, Tigers

6. Robinson Cano, Yankees

7. Adrian Gonzalez, Red Sox

8. Michael Young, Rangers

9. Dustin Pedroia, Red Sox

10. Evan Longoria, Rays

NL MVP

1. Ryan Braun, Brewers

2. Matt Kemp, Dodgers

3. Prince Fielder, Brewers

4. Justin Upton, Diamondbacks

5. Albert Pujols, Cardinals

6. Joey Votto, Reds

7. Lance Berkman, Cardinals

8. Troy Tulowitzki, Rockies

9. Roy Halladay, Phillies

10. Ryan Howard Phillies

AL Cy Young Award

1. Justin Verlander, Tigers

2. Jered Weaver, Angels

3. James Shields, Rays

4. CC Sabathia, Yankees

5. Jose Valverde, Tigers

6. C.J. Wilson, Rangers

7. Dan Haren, Angels

8. Mariano Rivera, Yankees

9. Josh Beckett, Red Sox

10. Ricky Romero, Blue Jays

NL Cy Young Award

1. Clayton Kershaw, Dodgers

2. Roy Halladay, Phillies

3. Cliff Lee, Phillies

4. Ian Kennedy, Diamondbacks

5. Cole Hamels, Phillies

6. Tim Lincecum, Giants

7. Yovani Gallardo, Brewers

8. Matt Cain, Giants

9. John Axford, Brewers

9. Craig Kimbrel, Braves

AL Rookie of the Year

1. Jeremy Hellickson, Rays

2. Mark Trumbo, Angels

3. Eric Hosmer, Royals

4. Ivan Nova, Yankees

5. Michael Pineda, Mariners

6. Dustin Ackley, Mariners

7. Desmond Jennings, Rays

7. Jordan Walden, Angels

NL Rookie of the Year

1. Craig Kimbrel, Braves

2. Freddie Freeman, Braves

3. Vance Worley, Phillies

4. Wilson Ramos, Nationals

5. Josh Collmenter, Diamondbacks

6. Danny Espinosa, Nationals

7. Darwin Barney, Cubs

7. Kenley Jansen, Dodgers

AL Manager of the Year

1. Joe Maddon, Rays

2. Jim Leyland, Tigers

3. Ron Washington, Rangers

4. Manny Acta, Indians

5. Joe Girardi, Yankees

6. Mike Scioscia, Angels

NL Manager of the Year

1. Kirk Gibson, Diamondbacks

2. Ron Roenicke, Brewers

3. Tony La Russa, Cardinals

4. Charlie Manuel, Phillies

5. Fredi Gonzalez, Braves

6. Bruce Bochy, Giants

6. Clint Hurdle, Pirates

8. Terry Collins, Mets

8. Don Mattingly, Dodgers

> Most of them seemed deserving enough. Although I was surprised to see Longoria even on the AL MVP ballot.

> Anyway, onto some Brewers news. They’ve offered arbitration to free agents Prince Fielder and Francisco Rodriguez. Assuming both decline it (which they probably both will), the Brewers will get four premium picks in next year’s First-Year Player Draft.

> Which brings me to my next point. I didn’t pay much attention to the small print of the labor agreement reached between MLB and the players’ union because I was celebrating Braun’s MVP award, but apparently this new agreement is creating a salary cap on how much teams can pay players to sign with them after being drafted. This will probably effect how some teams draft for the next five years, especially teams that rely on the draft in order to contend, such as the Rays.

But hey, it’s what we’ve grown to expect from Bud Selig.

> The biggest news of today was the Indians bringing back the injury-prone Grady Sizemore on a one-year deal worth around $5 million. I guess they aren’t giving up on the center fielder yet, despite the fact he’s had five different surgeries over the past three years, and has averaged below 100 games played per season during that span.

> Bruce Chen has decided to go back to the Royals for the third straight year, but this time signed a two-year deal. Chen really came out of nowhere as a solid pitcher for the Royals in 2010, and had an even better 2011. But I’m surprised Chen’s “chencision” was to return to the Royals instead of play for a contending team. (In case you haven’t noticed, I occasionally use @TrippingOlney jokes on here.)

> Thanks for reading, and feel free to leave your thoughts. I’ll update again if any other big news comes out tonight.


After Gallardo blows away Phils, Brewers rally in seventh

September 11, 2011

Today is 9/11. 10 years ago today, I was sitting in preschool. In fact, I’m amazed I even have any memory of this day (but I’ve been known to remember my early years better than most). Anyway, as I was sitting in my desk at preschool, talking with friends that I wish I was still in contact with today, when I noticed the teachers starting to get antsy and nervous. Nobody else in the class noticed this, at least they weren’t showing it- but I wouldn’t expect a class of four year-olds to, I guess, which is why I’m so surprised I picked up on it. The teachers didn’t say anything, obviously because they didn’t expect a group of four year-olds to even remotely understand the events the had just occurred in New York.

I don’t remember the rest of the day all that well. I’m guessing my parents tried to explain to me what had happened, but I know that it wasn’t until a few years later that I actually realized the significance of that event to our country. And, to be honest, it wasn’t until last year that I saw actual footage of the disaster. But that’s probably a good thing, because if I’d been any younger, I wouldn’t have been able to take it. It was even tough for me to take last year, seeing the two planes crash into the towers, hearing the people scream, watching the people jump… Just terrifying. But, today, on the 10th anniversary of 9/11, Americans can proudly say that the very man behind 9/11- Osama Bin Laden- is gone for good.

Anyway, now that I’m done talking about that, let me say one more thing- to all the men and women who serve America, I salute you.

On one of the most depressing days of the year, the Brewers cheered me up by defeating one of my least favorite teams- the Phillies- 3-2. It snapped a five-game losing streak that the Brewers had going since last week in St. Louis. Speaking of St. Louis, the Cardinals defeated the Braves today, 6-3, and that lowered the Brewers’ magic number to 10, since the Brewers won as well. But the Cards swept the Braves, and are just 4.5 games back in the Wildcard race.

Yovani Gallardo flat-out killed the Phillies. He went seven great innings, giving up two runs on just three hits. He walked one and struck out 12, which ties a career-high. It was also Gallardo’s 16th win of the season, which continues to add on to a career-high in that category as well.

The Brewers got on the board against Vance Worley in the second inning on Jonathan Lucroy’s RBI groundout. They had tons of other chances to score, but, up until the seventh inning, the Brewers did what they’ve done best over the past few days- leave tons of runners in scoring position.

Gallardo ran into trouble in the sixth inning, giving up homers to both Shane Victorino and Ryan Howard to give the Phillies a 2-1 lead. Gallardo’s home runs allowed stat ballooned to 26 after today, and, in three September starts, he’s given up eight home runs. As long as they’re solo home runs, I’m fine with it, but, before today, they’d always be with runners on base.

Anyway, the Brewers finally gave the Phillies a taste of their own medicine in the seventh inning- they got three straight two-out hits, capped off by a go-ahead single by Ryan Braun. All of this happened off Worley, who took just his second loss of the year. It was also the first time in 14 games that Worley started that the Phillies have lost.

Rickie Weeks was in the starting lineup today after drawing a walk in last night’s game. But, he still doesn’t have an official at-bat since returning from the DL- he drew another walk today, and was hit by a pitch. I don’t know if the Phillies are extremely stupid, or if Weeks got a better eye while on the DL, but he just didn’t get anything to hit.

The Brewers have an off-day tomorrow, but will open up a two-game series with the Rockies at Miller Park on Tuesday. Zack Greinke (14-6, 3.93 ERA), who is 10-0 at Miller Park this year, will go for the Brewers. He has two starts against the Rockies this year, and has taken no-decisions in both, but the Brewers came back to win both of those games after Greinke left while on the hook for the loss. Greinke’s ERA in those two starts is 3.00, and he’s 1-1 with a 5.56 ERA overall in his career against the Rox.

The Rockies will counter with the struggling Esmil Rogers (6-5, 6.26 ERA). His ERA has been over 6.00 practically all season, despite his record starting off 5-1. Rogers has a 6.35 ERA in his career against the Brewers.


Brewers continue to slide after Hawkins’ 10th inning error

September 11, 2011

A few weeks ago, I was excited to see the Brewers in the playoffs. Now, I’m afraid that they’re just going to make fools of themselves.

The Brewers pretty much gave the Phillies a win on a silver platter tonight, falling to them 3-2 in 10 innings. It was their fifth straight loss, and gave the Phillies a series win.

There isn’t much to say about this game, as has been the case over the past few days. With the score tied at 2-2 in the top of the 10th and a guy on first, LaTroy Hawkins fielded a bunt by Carlos Ruiz. It was a great bunt, and Ruiz would have had him beat either way, but Hawkins just had to airmail it to first base and send the ball into the crowd. That gave the Phillies a 3-2 to lead that they wouldn’t relinquish, and sealed the Brewers’ fate. But you can’t do that to good teams like the Phillies, and, unfortunately, the Brewers have done it a lot this series.

This all wasted a solid start by Randy Wolf, who went seven innings while giving up two runs on nine hits. He walked two and struck out one. But Wolf has been getting screwed over all year, and should definitely have more than 12 wins. Same goes for Shaun Marcum, who also has 12 wins, but the lowest ERA in the Brewers’ rotation.

Anyway, the Brewers are officially slumping. But, with the month of August they had, I kind of expected this. First off, the Brewers aren’t the greatest September team out there. In fact, in 2008, they had to ride on the back of CC Sabathia and a collapse by the Mets in order to get themselves into the postseason because of their awful September. Secondly, with the August they had, you just knew they couldn’t keep it going in September.

But another thing- just yesterday, Tom Verducci became the first person to notice that, during the Brewers’ great August, they beat practically all sub-.500 teams. He’s the first person I’ve seen publicly announce that. I knew it all along, but just didn’t say anything because I wanted to remain positive about the Brewers’ great August. But, with how they’re playing against the Phillies, it’s obvious that the great August was because of sub-.500 teams.

Now, you could make the excuse that the reason their offense has been shut down the past few games because they’ve faced four great pitchers in a row- Chris Carpenter, Cole Hamels, Roy Halladay, and Cliff Lee. But, that excuse is actually invalid, because, despite the fact those four pitchers are good, three of those four pitchers had ERAs over 5.00 against the Brewers going into their previous starts (and two had ERAs over 6.00). So, the offense actually should have acted up.

Rickie Weeks had his first at-bat since July today, and drew a walk from Lee. Yes, a walk from Lee. Not something you hear very often, especially from a strikeout-prone second baseman making his first at-bat since coming off the DL. Anyway, Ron Roenicke said that Weeks would be in the starting lineup tomorrow for the first time since July. Also, another roster move for the Brewers- they called up pitching prospect Mike Fiers from Triple-A. So much for making no more call-ups, I guess.

The Brewers will try and avoid a series sweep at the hands of the Phillies tomorrow, and will send Yovani Gallardo (15-10, 3.71 ERA) to the mound. He’s coming off two bad starts against the Cardinals, but, maybe facing someone other than the Cardinal will get him back on track. He has a 1.35 ERA in 6 2/3 innings in his career against the Phillies.

The Phillies will counter with ANOTHER ace- man, this rotation is unfair. Well, I guess you can’t call Vance Worley (11-1, 2.85 ERA) an ace quite yet, but he’s definitely pitched liked one. The Phillies have won his last 14 starts.

Oh, and by the way, the Brewers have fallen behind the Diamondbacks for the second-best record in the National League. That means if it stays this way for the rest of the year, instead of starting the postseason at home against the Braves, we’ll start it on the road against the Phillies. Hopefully the Brewers can re-take the lead over the D-backs so that we actually have a chance to make it to the NLCS.