Peralta’s decent start spoiled by Conforto

May 21, 2016


> It wasn’t great, but it was a step in the right direction for the struggling Wily Peralta. Unfortunately, he gave up a key hit at the wrong time that cost him a potential win in the Brewers’ 3-2 loss to the Mets on Friday night. Milwaukee ran into lefty Steven Matz (6-1, 2.81 ERA), one of the hottest pitchers in baseball at the moment, and couldn’t do much to back Peralta (2-5, 6.99 ERA).

The Brewers did jump on him in the first inning, as Chris Carter slugged his thirteenth home run of the year, a two-run shot to right center. That would be all for the offense, however. Matz dominated the rest of the way, throwing seven innings of two-run ball while giving up just three hits. He didn’t walk a batter and struck out eight.

Peralta managed to hold the lead for a while, but his 2016 struggles once again showed up in the middle innings. He bent but didn’t break in the second when he gave up an RBI groundout to Rene Rivera. The Mets ambushed him in the sixth, however, as after Asdrubal Cabrera led off the inning with a single, Michael Conforto hit a go-ahead, opposite field two-run homer.

> Honestly, this was looking like Peralta’s best start of the season until Conforto gave the Mets the lead. He ended up not making it through the sixth, finishing at 5 2/3 innings while giving up three runs on six hits. Peralta walked two and struck out a season-high six. It was encouraging to see him making effective use of his heavy sinking fastball, as he’s still struggling to find his slider in 2016 (though he did throw a few good ones tonight).

Unfortunately for Peralta, this might not be enough to keep him in the rotation when Matt Garza returns. With the rest of the rotation’s pitching headed in the right direction as of late, it’s hard to imagine anyone other than Peralta getting the boot when the time comes.


> Domingo Santana was placed on the 15-day disabled list today with right shoulder soreness. Santana’s ailing shoulder has kept him out of the lineup multiple times over the past few weeks and, according to Craig Counsell, he hasn’t been making much progress.

In a corresponding move, the Brewers recalled outfielder Keon Broxton from Triple-A Colorado Springs. Broxton was Milwaukee’s opening day center fielder in 2016, but he was quickly optioned after going 0-for-16 with 11 strikeouts in his first stint in the Majors. In 25 games at Triple-A, however, Broxton hit .301 with seven home runs, 18 RBIs, and 15 stolen bases. The potential is obviously there, so hopefully he can figure it out at the big league level this time around.

> Ryan Braun was absent from the lineup once again today, likely because of the stiff back that held him from each of the two games prior. Counsell said he could return to the lineup this weekend against the Mets, but if that doesn’t happen, a trip to the 15-day DL could be in order.

With Santana on the DL and Braun shelved indefinitely at the moment, Kirk Nieuwenhuis and Alex Presley will likely both see even more playing time in the coming days. Broxton and Ramon Flores will receive an increase as well.

> Nieuwenhuis and Carlos Torres, each of whom were members of the Mets at some point last season, received their 2015 National League championship rings upon returning to Citi Field.

> The Yankees signed ex-Brewer reliever Neal Cotts to a minor league deal today. The Brewers could have used him this season with their lack of reliable left-handed relief until Will Smith returns.

> The Rays released catcher Carlos Corporan, another former Brewer.


> Broxton went 0-for-2 in his first big league start since being demoted on April 16, extending his hitless streak to 0-for-18 to start his big league career.

> Chris Capuano, who pitched for the Mets in 2011, struck out five batters in two hitless innings of relief.

> Matz won his sixth consecutive start. Since getting lit up by the Marlins in his season debut, Matz is 6-0 with a 1.35 ERA.

> The Brewers will look to even up this three-game series tomorrow at 3:10 p.m. CT, but will have to face the ace of the Mets’ aces in Jacob deGrom (3-1, 2.50 ERA). Milwaukee will counter with Zach Davies (1-3, 5.58 ERA), who is coming off his best start of the season in which he allowed two runs in 6 1/3 innings against the Padres.

In four career starts against the Brewers, deGrom has been dominant, going 3-1 with a 1.38 ERA. Davies has never faced the Mets.

Nelson’s solid start for naught vs. Shields

May 13, 2016


> The Brewers had their chances on Thursday night, but in the end could not capitalize in a 3-0 loss to the Padres. They wasted a good start from Jimmy Nelson (4-3, 3.51 ERA), who rebounded from his worst start of the season against the Reds and posted arguably his best start. He went eight innings– his longest start of the year– while giving up two runs on just five hits. Nelson walked one and struck out five.

He received no help from his offense, however, which was stymied by a dominant James Shields (2-5, 3.12 ERA). The Padres righty scattered seven hits across seven scoreless innings while walking one and striking out nine.

The respective staff aces exchanged zeros through the first three innings before the Padres broke through against Nelson in the fourth. Wil Myers led off the inning with a single and then stole second base. Nelson rallied to record two outs and had a way out of the inning, but Melvin Upton Jr. dashed those hopes with an RBI single. The only other run against Nelson came in the seventh on an Alexei Ramirez sacrifice fly. Upton gave the Padres some more insurance in the ninth inning with a solo home run off Tyler Thornburg.

> The Crew certainly had opportunities against the Padres, but Shields managed to put out the fire in every situation. The Brewers’ most promising rally came in the sixth, when they had runners on first and third with one out thanks to singles from Jonathan Villar and Scooter Gennett. However, Shields managed to induce a Ryan Braun double play to escape unscathed. That was one of three double plays San Diego’s defense turned behind Shields, which definitely helped his cause.


> Milwaukee acquired right-handed reliever Jhan Marinez from the Rays last night in exchange for cash. Marinez has logged nine total big league innings since he debuted back in 2010. He has appeared in the Majors with the Marlins (2010), White Sox (2012), and Rays (2016) and has allowed three runs (3.00 ERA) in that small sample size. He’s logged a 4.00 ERA across 432 1/3 in 11 minor league seasons, including a 3.63 ERA in 178 1/3 innings at Triple-A. Marinez features just two pitches in his arsenal: a fastball that averages around 95 MPH and a mid-80’s slider. However, he has posted some encouraging stats during his long minor league career, including a 9.8 K/9 as well as a 25.1% strikeout rate. Conversely, Marinez has also shown control issues, with a career 5.3 BB/9 and 13.5% walk rate in the minors.

In a corresponding move, the Brewers designated left-handed reliever Michael Kirkman for assignment. Milwaukee claimed Kirkman off waivers from the Padres last week and he made just one appearance in a Brewers uniform, allowing a run in an inning.

It’ll be interesting to see if Marinez can hold down this final Brewers bullpen slot, which has been somewhat of a revolving door since the season started. Ariel Pena was rewarded the roster spot out of spring training, but was DFA’d after a disaster appearance on opening day against the Giants. Lefty Sam Freeman replaced him for a time, but he was also DFA’d after posting an ERA over 12.00. Kirkman most recently vacated the slot prior to Marinez.

> Will Smith will throw off a mound today for the first time since he tore is LCL towards the end of spring training. If that goes well, he’ll begin a throwing program. However, if he continues to struggle with the injury, surgery, which Smith has attempted to avoid at all costs, might be inevitable.

> The Rangers signed former Brewers starter Kyle Lohse to a minor league deal today.


> Nelson’s start against the Padres is the longest of any Brewers starter so far this season.

> Despite going 1-for-4 last night, Braun remains fourth in the Majors in batting average at .376.

> The Brewers outhit the Padres eight to seven last night. Upton had three of San Diego’s seven hits and was responsible for most of the damage.

> Gennett went 2-for-3 in his first start since coming off the disabled list.

> With his start against the Brewers last night, Shields has faced all 30 big league teams.

> The Brewers will hope to even up this four-game series tonight at 7:10 p.m. CT. Junior Guerra (1-0, 6.00 ERA) will take the mound for the Crew for his third career start. He’s allowed four runs over six innings in each of his first two starts this season. San Diego will counter with Christian Friedrich (0-0, -.– ERA), who will be making his Padres debut. In two career starts against Milwaukee, both of which came with the Rockies, Friedrich is 0-2 with a 6.39 ERA.

Random HGH testing to take place

January 11, 2013

> We may be looking at the end of the steroid era. MLB has finally decided to bring down the hammer, and in-season HGH testing is going to take place for the first time, starting in 2013.

Previously, testing only took place during Spring Training and the offseason, but now it’ll happen randomly during the regular season. The random timing of the testing brings about an element of surprise- in other words, players won’t know when they’re going to be tested, so they can’t juice up strategically and work around their testing dates (which they would have had prior knowledge of).

But this is definitely a positive for baseball. The doubts of the steroid era showed their true colors yesterday, as no one was inducted into the Hall of Fame for the first time since 1996. Players like Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds were never proven to have taken steroids, but the speculation was still out there, which was enough to keep them out of the Hall. This new rule should take that aspect away from the game (though it won’t show in the HOF voting for a few years to come).

> Now for an intriguing piece of Brewers news: the club brought aboard right-hander Kelvim Escobar with a minor league deal and an invite to Spring Training. Escobar hasn’t thrown a pitch in the Majors since 2009, and that was in just one start: he hasn’t pitched a full season since 2007.

2007 also happened to be Escobar’s career year, when he went 18-7 with a 3.40 ERA as a member of the Angels. For his career, he’s 101-91 with a 4.15 ERA (seven years with the Blue Jays, five in LA).

The odds of Escobar making the big league team at any point during the season are slim, barring a major injury to one or more of the Brewers’ starter prospects. But, at 36 years of age, he’ll still be a cool story to follow.

> The Brewers also avoided arbitration with Chris Narveson, one of the many starters competing for a spot in the rotation this spring. He received $840,000 in his first year of eligibility.

> The club outrighted Arcenio Leon to Triple-A yesterday after designating him for assignment earlier this week.

> Jonathan Lucroy is also going to play in the World Baseball Classic, joining Ryan Braun on Team USA.

> Minor moves: 

Giants: Signed Kensuke Tanaka to a minor league deal.
Nationals: Signed Ross Ohlendorf to a minor league deal.
Blue Jays: Claimed Tommy Hottovy off waivers from the Rangers; designated Chad Beck for assignment.
White Sox: Signed Jeff Gray, Ramon Troncoso, David Purcey, Bryan Anderson, Josh Bell, Steve Tolleson, and Stefan Gartrell to minor league deals.
Cubs: Re-signed Luis Valbuena to a one-year deal; signed Brent Lillibridge and Darnell McDonald to minor league deals.
Rays: Signed Craig Albernaz, Jason Bourgeois, and J.D. Martin to minor league deals.
Reds: Signed Nate Samson to a minor league deal.
Dodgers: Signed Matt Palmer to a minor league deal.

Rauch, Frasor, Farnsworth, Gonzalez on relief radar

December 18, 2012

> Doug Melvin has already missed out on multiple opportunities to sign relievers this offseason, the most notable guys being Jason Grilli and Sean Burnett. But, for the first time this offseason, Melvin himself named off a few relievers that the Brewers are currently interested in. Those names included Jon Rauch, Jason Frasor, Kyle Farnsworth, and Mike Gonzalez, all of whom were in my relief pitcher article from a few weeks back.

In my opinion, Frasor is by far the most attractive pitcher of those four. He fits the bill of a power arm the Brewers are looking for, and can pitch the eighth inning (I’m not so sure I completely trust Jim Henderson in the eighth yet). Frasor doesn’t have the greatest career numbers, but you have to take into consideration that he’s spent the majority of his career with the Blue Jays in the AL East, so a move to the NL might do him good.


The other three options Melvin listed are decent, I suppose. Farnsworth had a breakout season in 2011 as the Rays’ closer, but had an injury-plagued 2012. Gonzalez is that coveted lefty the Brewers are looking for (though I’d much prefer J.P. Howell, who I’m surprised Melvin didn’t mention), but the competition for him his; same goes for Howell. And I’d stay away from Rauch- he reminds me too much of Kameron Loe.

But if Melvin does decide to go after one of these guys, hopefully he gives him a substantial offer. Not that I want Melvin to overpay for a reliever, but I felt like he didn’t go hard enough for guys like Grilli or Burnett. However, the four guys Melvin mentioned today should come much cheaper than Grilli or Burnett.

> The Brewers signed utility infielder Donnie Murphy to a minor league contract with an invite to Spring Training. Murphy, who’s pretty versatile in the field, isn’t the greatest at the plate, as he hit just .216 in 129 plate appearances for the Marlins last year, and is a career .205 hitter. But, he does provide some depth at shortstop,a position the Brewers struggled with last year until the acquisition of Jean Segura. After Alex Gonzalez went down, we saw the tandem of Cody Ransom and Cesar Izturis flail miserably.

Anyway, Murphy should compete with guys like Mat Gamel and Taylor Green for one of the back-up infielder spots.

> Minor moves: 

Red Sox: Signed Stephen Drew to a one-year deal.
Athletics: Signed Hiroyuki Nakajima to a two-year deal.
Astros: Signed Carlos Pena to a one-year deal; designated Mickey Storey for assignment.
Cubs: Designated Jeff Beliveau for assignment.
Giants: Signed Santiago Casilla to a three-year extension.
Angels: Signed Luis Rodriguez to a minor league deal.
Royals: Released Ysrael Abreu, Jose Brazoban, Adelso Polanco, and Yerinson Tatis.

Hamilton, Dempster wiped off the market

December 15, 2012

> For the second straight offseason, the Angels have picked up the best hitter on the market with a sneaky deal that no one saw coming. Following a year in which they gave Albert Pujols a 10-year, $254 million deal, they handed out another huge contract to Josh Hamilton, this one for five years and $175 million. 

If you told me you saw this coming, I’d call you a liar. Their outfield seemed set with Mike Trout, Mark Trumbo, and Peter Bourjos, a young core that could last them a long time. But, much to the chagrin of their division rival Rangers, they went out and stole the best free agent on the market, and will insert Hamilton into one of those outfield slots (likely Bourjos’).

It was speculated all offseason that the Brewers had interest in Hamilton, and there were articles as recent as December 6th saying that Milwaukee would make a run at him. But, realistically, the Brewers were never going to get him, especially at his price tag.

Anyway, the Angels’ lineup now looks something like this: Trout, Erick Aybar, Pujols, Hamilton, Kendrys Morales, Trumbo, Howie Kendrick, Alberto Callaspo, and Chris Iannetta.

Looks like Los Angeles is the new New York.


> The Brewers’ top starting starting pitching target, Ryan Dempster, was also taken away, as the Red Sox wooed him with a two-year, $26.5 million deal. Apparently, the Brewers were willing to give Dempster two years plus an option for a third, but they didn’t come close to what Boston was offering cash-wise. Anyway, I don’t see Dempster doing well in the American League after what he did for the Rangers last year, but that was his choice.

With Dempster off the market, the likelihood of the Brewers bringing in a free agent starter this offseason decreased by a lot. The rest of the crop is either too Jeff Suppan-like or won’t fit the Brewers financial situation. The next best option after Dempster would be Edwin Jackson, but that would only happen if he would be willing to take a one-year or two-year deal. If the reports of Jackson wanting a four or five-year deal are true, then the odds of him coming to Milwaukee aren’t very good.

But, as I’ve been saying, it isn’t the end of the world if the Brewers don’t bring in a new starter for 2013. I’m completely fine with them staying in-house and using the prospects who are big league-ready. If that is the case, the ideal rotation for the Brewers would be Yovani Gallardo, Marco Estrada, Chris Narveson, Wily Peralta, and Mike Fiers. While that seems like a relatively inexperienced rotation to someone who doesn’t watch the Brewers everyday, I think the Brewers will get by, especially with the best offensive lineup in the National League backing them up.

> One more major signing: the Tigers finalized a deal with Anibal Sanchez, who nearly went to the Cubs, this morning. The Cubs reportedly had a five-year, $75 million deal in place with Sanchez as recent as last night, but the Tigers were given the opportunity to counter the offer, and wound up getting him back.

Sanchez was one of the starters who the Brewers probably wouldn’t have been able to afford, but at least it’s good that the division rival Cubs won’t get him.

> Doug Melvin basically said that he doesn’t want Shaun Marcum back.

> The Brewers have been linked to Mike Adams, one of the better relievers on the market, recently. But Tom Haudricourt considers them out of the hunt for him. Adams started his career with the Brewers, pitching for them from 2004 to 2006.

> Long-time Brewers farmhand Amaury Rivas has signed a minor league deal with the Marlins. He was always one of my favorite minor league pitchers for the Brewers, but I figured he’d be gone at some point.

> Minor moves: 

Rangers: Signed Brandon Snyder to a minor league deal; outrighted Konrad Schmidt to Triple-A.
Padres: Signed Juan Oramas, Sean O’Sullivan, Gregorio Petit, and Rene Rivera to minor league deals; acquired Chris Rearick from the Rays.
Twins: Signed ex-Brewer Brandon Boggs, Ray Olmedo, Bryan Augenstein, Reynaldo Rodriguez, Scott Earlton, Virgil Vasquez, Mike O’Connor, and Jason Lane to minor league deals.
Giants: Signed Andres Torres to a one-year deal; signed Chad Gaudin to a minor league deal.
Braves: Signed Ramiro Pena to a one-year deal.
Rockies: Signed Tommy Manzella to a minor league deal.
Mets: Re-signed Manny Acosta to a one-year deal.
Yankees: Signed Bobby Wilson and Gil Velasquez to minor league deals; designated Josh Spence for assignment.
Cardinals: Signed Alex Reyes to a minor league deal; signed Ty Wigginton to a two-year deal.
Nationals: Signed Neivy Pilier and Brian Bocock to minor league deals.
Rays: Acquired Vince Belnome from the Padres.
Phillies: Signed Andres Blanco, Josh Fields, Cesar Jimenez, Steven Lerud, Michael Martinez, Zach Miner, Jermaine Mitchell, Pete Orr, and Humberto Quintero to minor league deals; claimed Mauricio Robles off waivers from the Mariners.
Royals: Signed Xavier Nady to a minor league deal.

Royals kill themselves in the long run

December 10, 2012

> About a half an hour ago, I saw a headline that read: “Shields AND Davis to Royals for Myers. Other names involved.”

At the time, I thought that wasn’t a bad deal for the Royals, who appeared to have acquired James Shields and Wade Davis from the Rays in exchange for prospect Wil Myers, who is arguably the top offensive prospect in the game. I thought “other names involved” meant some not-so-significant Double-A players whom the Royals wouldn’t be seeing anytime soon.

Nope. The other three prospects involved were left-hander Mike Montgomery, third baseman Patrick Leonard, and righty Jake Odorizzi (whom the Brewers dealt to the Royals in the Zack Greinke deal back in 2010).

In other words, the Royals are still stupid.

In my eyes, just Myers for Shields and Davis would have been fair. Shields is already 30 and has a year (plus an option) remaining on his contract. Davis was great as a reliever last year, but was mediocre at best as a starter for the Rays in 2010 and 2011. With the package they sent the Rays, the Royals should have been able to net David Price at the very least.

Anyway, the Royals should at least contend in 2013, which perhaps was the goal all along. The Royals haven’t made the playoffs since 1985, and it’s been questioned over the past few years whether their ownership is even trying  to win.

The Royals did improve their rotation: it’ll now look something like Shields, Jeremy Guthrie, Ervin Santana, Davis, and Bruce Chen (though I’d replace Chen with a prospect like Danny Duffy). Not the greatest rotation, but it’ll win games with the lineup that hits behind it.

This will help the Royals in 2013, but I think they’re going to regret this in the long run. Needless to say the Rays scammed them in this one.

> A day after signing Zack Greinke to a six-year, $147 million deal, the Dodgers dished out another huge contract, locking up Korean lefty Hyun-Jin Ryu with a six-year, $36 million deal.

> Minor moves: 

Indians: Signed Mark Reynolds to a one-year deal.
Phillies: Signed Zach Miner to a minor league deal.

Brewers return empty-handed

December 8, 2012

> This year’s edition of the Winter Meetings were a disappointment for the Brewers, to say the least. They offered deals to a few of their targets, including Ryan Dempster, Jason Grilli, and Sean Burnett, but all of them were rejected. Burnett ended up signing with the Angels because they offered him much more cash the Brewers. Grilli hasn’t signed yet, but the Brewers haven’t been in contact with him for over a week for some reason, so he’s off the table. Dempster is still out there, but is holding out for a three-year deal. So far, the parties interested in Dempster- the Brewers, Red Sox, and Royals- have offered him two-year deals, but have been hesitant to add on that third year because of his age.

So that’s about the gist of what happened- rather, what didn’t happen- at the Meetings.

> The Brewers did make a move today, however, signing left-hander Travis Webb to a minor league deal with an invitation to Spring Training.

Webb has spent his entire career with the Reds’ minor league affiliates, never making it to the Majors. He has a career ERA of 4.13 in the minors, but went a sub-par 2-6 with a 4.81 ERA in 2012 at Triple-A. Webb was a starter at the beginning of his professional career, but has since converted into a reliever.

> Doug Melvin said that the Brewers aren’t in on Brian Wilson. We can all take a sigh of relief now.

> Minor moves: 

Rays: Signed Jason Bourgeois to a minor league deal.
Astros: Took Josh Fields from the Red Sox in the Rule 5 Draft; took Nate Freiman from the Padres in the Rule 5 Draft; claimed Mickey Storey off waivers from the Yankees.
Cubs: Took Hector Rondon from the Indians in the Rule 5 Draft; re-signed Ian Stewart to a one-year deal.
Rockies: Took Danny Rosenbaum from the Nationals in the Rule 5 Draft; signed Justin Berg, Hernan Iribarren, Jeff Manship, Gustavo Molina, and Henry Wrigley to minor league deals.
Twins: Took Ryan Pressly from the Red Sox in the Rule 5 Draft; acquired Vance Worley and Trevor May from the Phillies; re-signed Jared Burton to a two-year deal.
Indians: Took Chris McGuiness from the Rangers in the Rule 5 Draft.
Marlins: Took Alfredo Silverio from the Dodgers in the Rule 5 Draft; took Braulio Lara from the Rays in the Rule 5 Draft.
Red Sox: Took Jeff Kobernus from the Nationals in the Rule 5 Draft; acquired Justin Henry from the Tigers; acquired Kyle Kaminska from the Pirates; signed Koji Uehara to a one-year deal; acquired Graham Godfrey from the Athletics.
Mets: Took Kyle Lobstein from the Rays in the Rule 5 Draft.
Diamondbacks: Took Starling Peralta from the Cubs in the Rule 5 Draft; signed Brandon McCarthy to a two-year deal.
Phillies: Took Ender Inciarte from the Diamondbacks in the Rule 5 Draft; acquired Ben Revere from the Twins.
White Sox: Took Angel Sanchez from the Angels in the Rule 5 Draft.
Orioles: Took T.J. McFarland from the Indians in the Rule 5 Draft.
Rangers: Took Coty Woods from the Rockies in the Rule 5 Draft; signed Randy Wells, Evan Meek, Brandon Allen, and Jake Brigham to minor league deals.
Padres: Acquired Wilfredo Boscan from the Rangers.
Braves: Re-signed Reed Johnson to a one-year deal.
Yankees: Re-signed Brett Gardner to a one-year deal; outrighted Jayson Nix to Triple-A.
Reds: Re-signed Ryan Ludwick to a two-year deal.