Marcum gets screwed over in return

August 26, 2012

POSTGAME

> It looked like Shaun Marcum was going to have a solid return from the disabled list tonight, but his defense had other ideas in the Brewers’ 4-0 loss to the Pirates. All four runs came in the fifth inning, none of them charged to Marcum.

Carlos Gomez started the inning by dropping what would have been a routine line drive out, and instead allowed Neil Walker to reach. Of course that run had to come around to score, as Michael McKenry doubled two batters later. Then Marcum let his frustration get to him, allowing three straight RBI hits to Jeff Karstens (the pitcher), Jose Tabata, and Travis Snider.

The Brewers never really posed much of a threat against Karstens all night. They got back-t0-back singles against him in the eighth inning before he left with an injury, but the Pirates’ bullpen bailed him out.

MY TAKE

> I haven’t seen anything in Jeff Bianchi. He got two hits in final two at-bats tonight, but had been 0-f0r-18 prior to that. He also made an error behind Marcum (he should have had three errors, actually). One of them came when he completely missed a cut-off throw from Norichika Aoki (it wasn’t the greatest throw, but there’s no reason he couldn’t have caught it) in the third inning. Then he botched another cut-off throw in the fifth, which definitely should have been an error. The only error he was actually charged with was a Yuniesque play in which the ball went under his glove on a routine play.

In other words, he’s basically been a Brooks Conrad 2.0. Maybe Jean Segura was unavailable tonight (or Ron Roenicke was giving him a “breather”), but I don’t want to see much more of this guy at shortstop.

> Marcum didn’t throw the ball too bad at all for his first start since June. He gave up a few hard-hit balls here and there, but definitely didn’t deserve this fate.
THE NEWS

> Bullpen coach Lee Tunnell is confident that John Axford will get back to his former self eventually.

“It’s a different thing [making adjustments] here than in A-ball. I think he’ll get it figured out. There’s flashes of it. His last three games were pretty solid, so it’s just a matter of staying locked in, I think.”

“If he goes through this tough year the right way, it’ll help him the rest of his career. Look at how he got to us- he has resilience. He has that in his personality.”

If you didn’t know, Tunnell was named the bullpen coach after Stan Kyles was unfairly fired.

> The Brewers outrighted Mike McClendon to Triple-A to make room for Bianchi on the roster.

> The huge blockbuster trade between the Dodgers and Red Sox was approved today. Adrian Gonzalez, Carl Crawford, Josh Beckett, and Nick Punto will head to LA in exchange for Rubby De La Rosa and four other Minor League players.

> Zack Greinke had his first legitimate good start for the Angels yesterday, going 7 2/3 innings while giving up one run against the potent Tigers lineup.

THE NUMBERS

> The Brewers out-hit the Pirates 9-7, yet were shut out and lost by four runs.

> Brewers pitchers didn’t give up an earned run today.

> Tomorrow’s match-up:

Mark Rogers (1-1, 5.02 ERA) vs. Erik Bedard (7-13, 4.76 ERA)

 

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Loe picks up Axford in shaky ninth

August 25, 2012

POSTGAME

> It was another bullpen classic tonight. The Brewers squeezed past the Pirates, 6-5, in a game that should have been a much easier win. They had a three-run lead going into the ninth inning, but, after a dominating performance on Wednesday, John Axford couldn’t handle it today.

The Brewers jumped on Wandy Rodriguez early, with back-to-back RBI hits from Corey Hart and Jonathan Lucroy to give them a 2-0 lead. But the Pirates answered back on an Andrew McCutchen two-RBI single in the fourth.

It was a pitchers’ duel between Mike Fiers and Rodriguez until the Brewers finally broke the game open in the seventh. Rodriguez was removed with a runner on second and two outs in favor of Jared Hughes, who got his head blown off by the Brewers. He started by hitting Rickie Weeks with the first pitch he threw, then walked Ryan Braun to load the bases. Aramis Ramirez made him pay with a bases-clearing double.

The Brewers had a 6-3 lead going into the ninth, so Axford was put in for what looked like an easy save situation, especially after his save Wednesday. But nothing is easy for him nowadays. He walked McCutchen and Garrett Jones to start the inning, then gave up an RBI single to Neil Walker. Axford seemed to find it for two batters, notching back-to-back strikeouts of Pedro Alvarez and Jeff Clement. But then he gave up another RBI single to Michael McKenry, and Ron Roenicke decided to yank him for Kameron Loe, who struck out Gaby Sanchez to record the save.

AXFORD CAN’T HANDLE IT ANYMORE

> I wrote an article yesterday regarding Axford’s confidence coming back after he recorded back-to-back saves. I also mentioned that he himself went up to Roenicke and personally asked for the closer’s role back.

But I guess I was wrong. Axford just no longer has the ability to string together good outings. I want to say he’ll get better, but each blown save (or practically blown save, which was the case tonight) just lessens my confidence in him more and more.

Yes, I know it’s probably too early to judge him, and there’s no reason that he can’t still turn it around before season’s end. But, at the same time, there’s no reason that he can’t become the next Derrick Turnbow, which, scarily enough, seems to be exactly what’s happening to him. Axford had a ton of saves last year and sub-2.00 ERA, and now can barely string together two good outings.

Sound familiar? Yes, it sounds very familiar. The exact same thing happened to Turnbow. And we all saw what happened to Turnbow after this happened to him.

I hate to be all negative about Axford, because he has great stuff, and still has the potential to be that dominant closer. But, just like Turnbow, he can’t get it together mentally anymore.

(Sorry if I brought back any bad memories with that photo.)

THE NEWS

> Randy Wolf said the Brewers organization treated him with respect and “has been outstanding” even after they released him. He’ll return to his home in Los Angeles to work out and hopefully wait on another big league opportunity.

> Shaun Marcum was offically reinstated from the disabled list today and will make his first start since early June tomorrow.

THE NUMBERS

> Fiers bounced back nicely after two rough outings against the Rockies and Phillies. He went 6 2/3 innings while giving up three runs on five hits. He walked two and struck out 10, which tied a career-high.

In Fiers’ two previous starts, he had a whopping 15.43 ERA.

> Braun got walked three times tonight, one of those times intentionally. Ramirez made the Bucs pay for all of those by going 2-for-4 with three RBIs.

> Jean Segura’s average has fallen to .189.

> Fiers finally recorded his first career hit, which was a bunt single to ignite the seventh inning rally.

> Tomorrow’s match-up:

Shaun Marcum (5-3, 3.39 ERA) vs. Jeff Karstens (4-3, 3.79 ERA)


Ransom gives Brewers grand start to second half

July 14, 2012

> The Brewers have a very crucial stretch of games coming up. Their next nine games are against division opponents, and this will definitely determine if the Brewers are indeed sellers for the first time in the Mark Attanasio era, or if they can come back and at least contend.

> They certainly started that stretch in a good way tonight. They defeated the first place Pirates, 10-7, in a back-and-forth slugfest that was expected to be a pitchers’ duel. There were a ton of storylines behind this game, so let’s start with a few of them.

Zack Greinke didn’t have a start to remember, but he will remember it. This was his third consecutive start, as he got ejected by Sam Holbrook in the first inning two games before the All-Star break, then started the next day as well. He became the first pitcher since Red Faber of the White Sox in 1917 to accomplish this feat.

Like I said, it wasn’t very special otherwise- he went five innings while giving up six runs (five earned) on seven hits. He walked two and struck out six. But, the Miller Park magic once again came into effect, and Greinke’s home record remains perfect.

His counterpart, James McDonald, didn’t do so well either. He couldn’t even make it out of the fifth inning, going just 4 2/3 innings while giving up five runs (four earned) on eight hits. He also walked five, which contributed to his pitch count of 109 in the short outing.

The Brewers put up a three-spot in the first inning. Ryan Braun hit a solo shot, followed by a Rickie Weeks two-run double to start the second half with a bang. But the wheels fell off for Greinke a few innings later. The Pirates got a run in the third thanks to a Weeks error with bases loaded, then they took the lead in the fourth on Drew Sutton’s RBI double and Neil Walker’s go-ahead three-run homer. Braun got the Brewers a run back in the bottom of the inning with an RBI single, but Pedro Alvarez made the deficit 6-4 in the fifth with a solo shot.

Then the comeback trail began. Travis Ishikawa hit a pinch-hit RBI single in the fifth, then Braun tied the game up in the sixth with his second home run of the night.

The Brewers managed to come full circle in the eighth inning and finally take the lead. Braun and Aramis Ramirez hit back-to-back singles with one out. Corey Hart then struck out, but the Brewers pulled a double steal on the pitch. That prompted Pirates reliever Tony Watson to intentionally walk Weeks, which was surprising, unless you consider Cody Ransom was coming up next.

But, boy, did Ransom make them pay. All the Brewers would have needed was a little bloop single, which are usually what Ransom’s hits are like when he isn’t striking out. Instead, Ransom smashed a line drive in to deep left field for a go-ahead grand slam. I can tell you honestly that it was the craziest Miller Park had been since October of last year; I was at the game.

Andrew McCutchen hit a solo home run in the ninth, but it wasn’t enough for the Pirates.

> Even though the Brewers won this game, I’m still worried about Axford. He did get a save the other day, but was shaky. And now he gives up another home run tonight. If the Brewers truly want to contend in the second half, they’re going to have to find out what’s wrong with Axford (and the rest of the ‘pen for that matter).

> And that’s already about it. I got home late from the game, so I don’t have much time right now. But, for now, thanks for reading, and feel free to leave your thoughts.


The 2011 Pirates could be a signal…

December 4, 2011

> A signal that they may be coming back from the dead.

The Pirates had a typical Pirates season in 2011, typical meaning what we’ve come to expect of them ever since 1992. They went 72-90, which was at least an improvement from their 57-105 season in 2010. But, it was still nowhere near contention, as they finished 24 games back of the first place Brewers.

The Pirates can say the finished ahead of the Cubs and Astros for the first time in a few years, but each of those two teams had excuses- the Cubs were managed by Mike Quade, and, by the end of the season, the Astros didn’t have one household name (AKA star player) on their team.

But, it appeared at the All-Star break that the Pirates weren’t going to finish the season like they usually do. Around that time, they were actually in first place for awhile. The terms “first place” and “Pirates” hadn’t been associated with each other since 1992.

By the All-Star break, the Pirates were just one game out of first place. And they had rode pitching all the way there. At the time, their starters- Paul Maholm (6-9, 2.96 ERA), Kevin Correia (11-7, 4.01 ERA), James McDonald (5-4, 4.42 ERA), Charlie Morton (7-5, 3.80 ERA), and Jeff Karstens (7-4, 2.55 ERA)- were all giving the Pirates a chance to win. And their bullpen was solidified by All-Star closer Joel Hanrahan, who, at the time, had yet to blow a save all year.

On one fateful night, however, everything fell apart.

It was July 26th, and the Pirates record at the time was 53-48- good for third in the NL Central and still in the heat of the pennant race (the Cardinals and Brewers were tied for first). The Pirates were in the final game of a three-game series with the Braves in Atlanta, and looking for a series win. Little did they know that when the game started, they’d have to wait around seven hours for a result- a very frustrating result.

The game ended up going 19 innings. The starter that night, Karstens, had turned in just five innings, forcing the Pirates to use nearly every pitcher in their bullpen.

In the bottom of the 19th inning, the game tied 3-3, reliever Daniel McCutchen was in his sixth inning of work (and he was supposed to have a night off). Scott Proctor, the relief pitcher for the Braves, was at the plate, while Julio Lugo stood at third base. McCutchen threw a slider, and Proctor tapped a grounder to third baseman Pedro Alvarez. Alvarez threw it home to catcher Michael McKenry, who caught the ball and tagged out Lugo.

But home plate umpire Jerry Meals had other ideas.

The Pirates playoff hopes were crushed by an umpire in the 19th inning of a game in Atlanta.

After McKenry obviously tagged Lugo, Meals called Lugo safe, and the Braves won, 4-3, in 19 innings. Pirates manager Clint Hurdle came bustling out of the dugout to join an argument that McCutchen and McKenry were already having with Meals. But there was no changing it- the wrong call had been made, and it stood.

The next day (actually the same day, as the game ended early the next morning), Meals did what only an idiot umpire would do- come out and admit that the call was wrong after the game is over. I hate it when umpires do that, because they’re simply enraging the team they screwed over more, because now that team knows that they actually had a shot at continuing the game and possibly winning.

Anyway, in some Pirates’ fans minds, that was probably the end of the season for them. You can’t blame them for not recuperating in time after a game like that because of the exhausted bullpen (and everyone else was probably exhausted as well).

Remember the numbers I listed for the Pirates’ starters earlier? Yeah, they looked a little different by the end of the season. Maholm finished didn’t win another start all year, finishing 6-14 with a 3.66 ERA. Correia,  who had already started his decline before the numbers I showed, faltered even more before he went on the DL to finish the year, going 12-11 with a 4.79 ERA. McDonald actually pitched decent, finished 9-9 with a 4.21 ERA. Morton couldn’t continue what appeared to be a great comeback season for him, going 10-10 with a 3.83 ERA. Lastly, Karstens finished 9-9 with a 3.38 ERA, a significant increase in ERA from 2.55.

But, I have a feeling the Pirates aren’t going to be pushovers in the Central for much longer. They have loads of talent, such as Neil Walker, Andrew McCutchen, Jose Tabata, and so on. If they can get a little more pitching and just put everything together over the next few years, they could be a force in the Central.

But first, they need to find a way to beat the Brewers, who have flat-out punished them over the past few years. Since 2009, the Pirates have a total of nine wins against the Brewers. Personally, I hope that continues, though.

> Rumor has it that the Brewers may have already made an offer to free agent third baseman Aramis Ramirez. I’ve heard that it’s a three-year deal with a mutual option for a fourth, but it’s nowhere near confirmed- it may have not even happened yet.

Still, I kind of hope the Brewers sign him. That would at least help fill the void that Prince Fielder is going to leave in the offense.

> I’ve also heard from various sources that Doug Melvin has spoken with free agent shortstop Jose Reyes‘ agents. A few weeks ago, it was supposedly “guaranteed” that Reyes was going to sign with the Marlins, but I haven’t heard anything between the two teams since

Now, Brewers might sign one of them (meaning Reyes or Ramirez, but I kind of doubt they’ll sign either. But imagine if they signed both. The payroll simply won’t permit (and that new salary cap isn’t helping either), but those two on the Brewers would make up for Fielder’s absence.

UPDATE: The Marlins and Reyes have reportedly agreed to a six-year, $106 million deal, which officially puts the Brewers out of the mix for him.

> Unless Fielder can’t find a job with another team. It doesn’t appear anyone wants him, and same goes for Albert Pujols. Who would have thought that the two most coveted free agents on the market might be forced to sign with their former team if they want to keep playing in the MLB?

> Former pitcher Pedro Martinez officially announced his retirement last night, after not pitching in the Majors since 2009 with the Phillies.

Say what you will, but he’s going to the Hall of Fame.

> A minor trade happened yesterday, as the Blue Jays sent lefty starter Brad Mills to the Angels in exchange for catcher Jeff Mathis.

> It’s still early in the day, and nothing’s really happened yet. But, if something does happen, I’ll update ASAP. Anyway, thanks for reading, and feel free to leave your thoughts.


Kotsay gets walk-off single in ninth as Brewers roll

August 17, 2011

9:50p The Brewers seem to find new ways to win every day nowadays, and today was no different.

Dodgers-Brewers Wrap-Up

The Brewers defeated the Dodgers again today, 2-1, to continue their winning streak, which now stands at five. The final blow came on Mark Kotsay’s walk-off single in the ninth inning off Dodgers reliever Mike MacDougal, who was struggling with his command throughout the inning, but I’ll get to that later.

The Dodgers actually struck first in the second inning against Yovani Gallardo when Aaron Miles hit a RBI single to drive in Matt Kemp. Gallardo struggled with his command early before settling in, but that was the only run he would give up. He ended up going eight innings while giving up a run on four hits. He struck out nine and walked one. This performance was uncharacteristic of Gallardo against the Dodgers, who came into today with an 0-3 record with a 10.80 ERA against them in his career. He didn’t pick up the win, unfortunately, settling for a no-decision, but that ERA probably took a large drop.

Anyway, the Brewers countered right away in the bottom of the second on Corey Hart’s RBI groundout. The game would become a pitchers’ duel and stay tied until the ninth inning.

Dodgers starter Chad Billingsley also had a good start (not as good as Gallardo’s, but still good). He went seven innings while giving up a run on four hits. He struck out five and walked two.

Following Billingsley’s good outing, however, would be a bullpen meltdown for the Dodgers. They brought in Hong-Chih Kuo, a lefty, to face Prince Fielder leading off the inning. He promptly walked Fielder, which made Dodgers manager Don Mattingly go right back to his bullpen. This time, he brought out the right-handed MacDougal, who didn’t fare much better. He gave up a hit to Casey McGehee, then walked Yuniesky Betancourt to load the bases with no outs. That set the stage for Kotsay’s second walk-off single of the year.

Kotsay comes through in the clutch again

At times throughout the year, I’ve been extremely frustrated with Kotsay. A lot of times, he falters with guys on base by striking out, hitting an easy grounder, etc., but that all seems to change whenever he bats under pressure in the ninth. Kostay already had a walk-off against Francisco Cordero and the Reds earlier this year, and a game-tying single against Cordero and the Reds as well.

Brewers winning without many runs

Over the past four games, the Brewers have scored a total of eight runs. And yet they’re 4-0 in those games. Any other year before this, they would probably have been 0-4, but, this year, the pitching is good enough to bail out the Brewers even when there’s a lack of offense.

The Brewers have also hit only three home runs over the past four games, and all three of them came last night. So that goes to show that the Brewers don’t need the long ball to win, either.

Brewers extend division lead to seven

To go along with a Brewers win tonight, the Cardinals conveniantly lost in Pittsburgh. Garrett Jones hit a walk-off home run in the 10th inning off newly signed Arthur Rhodes, who has been a bust with both the Rangers and Cardinals this year. The game actually wouldn’t have even had to go to extra innings, had Fernando Salas not given up a game-tying homer to Neil Walker in the ninth. But, I guess that’s what the Cardinals get for not upgrading the back end of their bullpen at the Trade Deadline, despite the fact that was their biggest need. (And no, Octavio Dotel, Marc Rzepczynski, and Arthur Rhodes don’t count as the “back end.”)

Up next for the Crew…

The Brewers will go for a series win against the Dodgers tomorrow and will send Zack Greinke (11-4, 4.08 ERA) to the mound. Greinke is on a roll since the All-Star break, and is 4-1 with a 1.56 ERA since then. He has a 5.40 ERA in five innings for his career against the Dodgers, so I don’t really know what to make of that.

The Dodgers will counter with rookie starter Nathan Eovaldi (1-0, 1.64 ERA), who will be making his third Major League start. He shut out the Astros for six innings his last time out, but the Brewers will obviously be much more of a challenge. I still don’t know much about Eovaldi, so I guess we’ll have to see how he does tomorrow.


Despite lack of offense, Estrada, bullpen shut down Bucs

August 14, 2011

6:24p This game pretty much proved that it just isn’t possible for the Pirates to beat the Brewers, especially in Milwaukee.

Pirates-Brewers Wrap-Up

A second inning home run by Yuniesky Betancourt was all the Brewers pitching staff needed in a 1-0 win over the Pirates. Starter Marco Estrada held down the Bucs for five innings, in which he gave up no runs and one hit. He didn’t walk anyone and struck out five. Oddly enough, manager Ron Roenicke pulled him in the bottom of the fifth inning for a pinch-hitter, but that pinch-hitter was Zack Greinke, and all he did was a lay down a sacrifice bunt. But, Roenicke’s decision played out, I assume, how he expected it to even before the game started, because the bullpen shut out the Pirates for the remaining four innings.

Pirates starter Kevin Correia was actually pretty good, considering how many baserunners he allowed. He went 6 2/3 innings while giving up a run on seven hits. He walked three and struck out three. Correia could have been hit much harder, but the Brewers uncharacteristically struggled with runners in scoring position at home today. They left 10 guys on against Correia, which spared his already high ERA. But, coming into today, Correia was 10-2 on the road. He is now 10-3 with two of the three losses coming at Miller Park.

Anyway, back to the Brewers bullpen. Takashi Saito, LaTroy Hawkins, and Francisco Rodriguez combined for three shutout innings during which they only gave up one hit (the hit given up by Rodriguez). That set the stage for John Axford, who, as usual, made the ninth somewhat interesting.

Axford gave up a triple leading off the inning to Xavier Paul, and, from there, I was thinking that Axford’s save streak was over. But, with the infield in, he induced to groundball outs and kept the runner at third. After walking Garrett Jones, he struck out Neil Walker to end the game and give the Brewers a 7-0 record against the Bucs this year.

Estrada is clearly a starter.

After seeing his performance today, I realized that Estrada is obviously better as a starter. He just wasn’t getting it done in the bullpen, and came into today having given up at least a run in three consecutive appearances out of the ‘pen. But, today, he was better than all of his appearances since the All-Star break combined.

Betancourt goes deep on 0-2 count

There’s actually a significance to this. We all know that Betancourt is a free-swinging guy, but this stat really shocked me. Betancourt’s home run today marked the first time in his career that he went deep on an 0-2 count. Yep- the first time in 257 at-bats that reached 0-2 in his career. That’s kind of a scary stat, if you think about it, no matter how free-swinging a guy is.

Injury update on Gomez

Injured center fielder Carlos Gomez has started his road back after fracturing his left clavicle in Arizona on July 20 while making a highlight reel catch. He ran sprints and threw from 90 feet for the first time since the injury and is going to start hitting sometime next week. There is still no timetable for Gomez’s return, however.

Before his injury, Gomez in a center field platoon with Nyjer Morgan. Gomez typically got starts against left-handed pitching, while Morgan usually got the starts against right handers.

Up next for the Crew…

The Brewers will go for yet another sweep of the Pirates tomorrow. They’ll send Shaun Marcum (10-3, 3.62 ERA) to the mound. He received a no-decision against the Cardinals his last time out. Marcum has one career start against the Pirates, and that was back on April 13th, when he shut them out for seven innings.

The Pirates will counter with the resurging Charlie Morton (9-6, 3.56 ERA), who currently has a 17 inning scoreless streak going, which includes eight shutout innings of the Giants his last time out. Morton is 0-4 with an 8.31 ERA against the Brewers in his career, but he is a completely changed pitcher this year. If you don’t know his story, then read below. It’s actually sort of cool.

Morton had a horrible 2010 campaign- he went 2-12 with a 7.57 ERA. So, in the offseason, he decided to completely reinvent himself as a pitcher, and changed his arm slot to more of a 3/4 delivery, rather than the overhand motion he used to use. In fact, he pretty much copied the mechanics of Phillies’ ace Roy Halladay. If you watch the two pitchers’ mechanics side by side, it’s pretty tough to find any differences in them. The results, obviously, aren’t as good as Halladay’s, but Morton is having a far better season than he did last year.

Elsewhere around the division…

  • The Cubs are currently leading the Braves, 1-0, in the bottom of the third. That probably won’t last long, though. Especially if another Cubs player decides he wants to retire in the middle of a game. Anyway, the Cubs are 17.5 games back right now.
  • The Reds are beating the Padres, 4-0, in the bottom of the third as well. They are 10.5 games back, and have passed the Pirates to take third place in the division; at least for now.
  • The Cardinals are losing to the Rockies, 3-0, in a game that’s about to go into the fourth inning. The Cards are currently 4.5 games back, and I can’t tell you how huge that would be for the Brewers if they lose today.
  • The Astros and Dodgers start later tonight at 9:10. But really… Does anybody care what the Astros do at this point? That 38-81 mark pretty much defines how their season is going to end.

Box Score

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Pittsburgh Pirates 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Milwaukee Brewers 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 1 8 0

Milwaukee Brewers

Player AB R H RBI BB SO LOB AVG
Corey Hart, RF 3 0 1 0 1 0 2 .273
Nyjer Morgan, CF 4 0 1 0 0 1 3 .320
Ryan Braun, LF 3 0 1 0 1 1 3 .323
Prince Fielder, 1B 3 0 1 0 1 0 2 .308
Casey McGehee, 3B 4 0 1 0 0 2 4 .238
Yuniesky Betancourt, SS 3 1 1 1 1 0 1 .270
Jerry Hairston, 2B 4 0 0 0 0 0 3 .255
Jonathan Lucroy, C 4 0 1 0 0 1 2 .284
Marco Estrada, P 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 .300
a-Zack Greinke, PH 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .194
b-Felipe Lopez, PH 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 .215
Total 30 1 8 1 4 5 20

a-Hit a sacrifice bunt for Estrada in the 5th.

b-Grounded out for Hawkins in the 7th.

BATTING

2B: Estrada (1).

HR: Betancourt (9).

RBI: Betancourt (51).

Team RISP: 1-for-10.

Team LOB: 10.

BASERUNNING

SB: Braun (22).

Milwaukee Brewers

Player IP H R ER BB SO HR ERA
Marco Estrada (W, 3-7) 5.0 1 0 0 0 5 0 4.46
Takashi Saito (H, 7) 1.0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2.51
LaTroy Hawkins (H, 18) 1.0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1.69
Francisco Rodriguez (H, 8) 1.0 1 0 0 0 2 0 2.89
John Axford (S, 34) 1.0 1 0 0 1 1 0 2.44

Pitches-strikes: Estrada 64-44, Saito 10-8, Hawkins 11-7, Rodriguez 14-12, Axford 21-13.

Groundouts-flyouts: Estrada 6-2, Saito 1-1, Hawkins 1-1, Rodriguez 0-1, Axford 2-0.

Batters faced: Estrada 16, Saito 3, Hawkins 3, Rodriguez 4, Axford 5.