Results of the major awards

November 17, 2012

> Now that the week of debating over awards is over, the boring part of the offseason starts: waiting for all of the big name players to sign. But first, let’s look at the complete placing for each award (via Baseball Reference).

NL MVP:

1. Buster Posey
2. Ryan Braun
3. Andrew McCutchen
4. Yadier Molina
5. Chase Headley
6. Adam LaRoche
6. David Wright
8. Craig Kimbrel
9. Aramis Ramirez
10. Jay Bruce
11. Matt Holliday
12. Aroldis Chapman
13. Brandon Phillips
14. R.A. Dickey
14. Joey Votto
16. Ian Desmond
16. Clayton Kershaw
18. Michael Bourn
19. Allen Craig
20. Gio Gonzalez
20. Kris Medlen
20. Martin Prado
20. Alfonso Soriano
24. Giancarlo Stanton
24. Ryan Zimmerman
26. Carlos Beltran
26. Aaron Hill
28. Jason Heyward
28. Carlos Ruiz
30. Johnny Cueto
30. Bryce Harper
32. Chipper Jones
32. Miguel Montero
32. Angel Pagan
32. Hunter Pence

AL MVP: 

1. Miguel Cabrera
2. Mike Trout
3. Adrian Beltre
4. Robinson Cano
5. Josh Hamilton
6. Adam Jones
7. Derek Jeter
8. Justin Verlander
9. Prince Fielder
10. Yoenis Cespedes
11. Edwin Encarnacion
12. David Price
13. Fernando Rodney
14. Jim Johnson
15. Alex Rios
16. Josh Reddick
17. Albert Pujols
18. Ben Zobrist
19. Joe Mauer
20. Rafael Soriano
21. Matt Wieters
22. Felix Hernandez
22. Jered Weaver
24. Raul Ibanez

NL Cy Young Award: 

1. R.A. Dickey
2. Clayton Kershaw
3. Gio Gonzalez
4. Johnny Cueto
5. Craig Kimbrel
6. Matt Cain
7. Kyle Lohse
8. Aroldis Chapman
8. Cole Hamels

AL Cy Young Award: 

1. David Price
2. Justin Verlander
3. Jered Weaver
4. Felix Hernandez
5. Fernando Rodney
6. Chris Sale
7. Jim Johnson
8. Matt Harrison
9. Yu Darvish

NL Rookie of the Year: 

1. Bryce Harper
2. Wade Miley
3. Todd Frazier
4. Wilin Rosario
5. Norichika Aoki
6. Yonder Alonso
6. Matt Carpenter
6. Jordan Pacheco

AL Rookie of the Year: 

1. Mike Trout
2. Yoenis Cespedes
3. Yu Darvish
4. Wei-Yin Chen
5. Jarrod Parker

NL Manager of the Year: 

1. Davey Johnson
2. Dusty Baker
3. Bruce Bochy
4. Fredi Gonzalez
5. Bud Black
5. Mike Matheny

AL Manager of the Year: 

1. Bob Melvin
2. Buck Showalter
3. Robin Ventura
4. Joe Maddon
5. Joe Girardi
6. Jim Leyland
6. Ron Washington

> I forgot to mention the other day that Ramirez placed ninth in the NL MVP voting. It seems like a lot of non-Brewers fans are overlooking that he actually turned in a great year.

> The Brewers signed Eulogio De La Cruz and Zach Kroenke- both pitchers- to minor league deals.

Kroenke is a lefty, so he gives the Brewers some much-needed depth in that department. And, if you don’t recognize the name “Eulogio” De La Cruz, trust me- you do.

Does “Frankie” De La Cruz ring a bell? Yep, he’s back, and n0w I can continue vomiting over how horrible his mechanics are.

> Jack Zduriencik- a former Brewers scout, and currently the general manager of the Mariners- said they aren’t actively pursuing Josh Hamilton. That could be good for the Brewers, though Doug Melvin has been saying basically the same thing as Zduriencik.

> The Blue Jays signed Melky Cabrera to a two-year deal worth $16 million. Interpret that how you want.

> Minor moves: 

Mets: Signed Brian Bixler to a minor league deal.
Padres: Acquired Tyson Ross and A.J. Kirby-Jones from the Athletics.
Athletics: Acquired Andrew Werner and Andy Parrino from the Padres.
Royals: Signed Brandon Wood, Atahualpa Severino, Brian Sanches, and Anthony Ortega to minor league deals.

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Greinke’s solid effort goes for naught after 15 innings

June 18, 2012

> These aren’t the type of games you can lose. The Brewers’ fell to the Twins today, 5-4, after an extremely discouraging 15 innings. Despite a solid effort from Zack Greinke, the Brewers couldn’t capitalize on any late-inning RISP chances.

Greinke went eight innings while giving up four runs on eleven hits. He walked two and struck out six. The eleven hits and four runs don’t look too great on the box score, but those numbers are because of a bump in the road in the seventh. Other than that, he had a decent start. But this was just his second time completing eight innings as a Brewer.

The Brewers got on the board quickly against Twins starter Nick Blackburn on Aramis Ramirez’s RBI single in the first inning. But Joe Mauer helped the Twins answer back in the third inning with an RBI single of his own.

Then, in the fifth inning, the Brewers put up their biggest threat of the game. Norichika Aoki led off the inning with a double off the right field wall, and Nyjer Morgan followed that by reaching on a bunt single. That gave the Brewers runners on first and third with no outs, but they nearly wasted the opportunity. Ryan Braun hit a weak pop up to second baseman Jamey Carroll, and Ramirez struck out looking. That brought up Corey Hart, who battled with Blackburn until the count was full. Hart then came through in the clutch and hit a three-run blast over the right field wall, not an easy feat at Target Field. This gave the Brewers a 4-1 lead.

But then came Greinke’s rough seventh. I don’t want to say he melted down, but he did blow the lead. He started the inning by walking the hot-hitting Trevor Plouffe, which I didn’t mind; it’s better than him hitting another one into the second deck. Greinke then recovered by inducing a Ryan Doumit pop-out and a Brian Dozier groundout, with Plouffe advancing to second on the groundout. Then came a Twins hitting barrage. Carroll drove in Plouffe with an RBI single, and Denard Span followed that with another single to put runners on first and third. Ben Revere then hit an RBI single, which set the stage for another RBI single by Mauer, who once again tied up the game.

No one would have guessed that the next run of the game would come another eight innings later. Tim Dillard was on to pitch the 15th inning, and gave up a lead-off single to Plouffe. He came back to strike out Doumit, but then gave up a single to Dozier. Carroll followed that up with a single that Plouffe tried to score on, but the right fielder Aoki gunned him down at home. This put runners on first and third with one out. Then, Ron Roenicke made yet another questionable move by replacing Dillard with lefty Juan Perez to face the left-handed hitting Span. I still don’t know why, since Dillard appeared to be handling the rest of the lefties in the Twins’ lineup just fine. Naturally, though, Span hit a walk-off single off Perez to give the Twins their win.

> But the Brewers wasted a ton of scoring chances all game, especially in the extra innings they were given. They wound up leaving 17 men on base, which is averaging over one man left on per inning. And they wonder why the aren’t scoring runs.

> Today was an interesting game. The game seemed to be moving along at a reasonable case, although it started raining after the first pitch and continued to drizzle until around the 11th inning. As Kameron Loe was finishing pitching the 11th, the skies opened up, and the tarp was pulled onto the field. So there was a rain delay in extra innings, not something you see very often. But this made the game extend to nearly six hours long.

> Sort of a random note to end on, but that’s about it. The Brewers come back home to start a three-game set with the Blue Jays tomorrow. Here are what the matchups are looking like:

Henderson Alvarez (3-6, 3.87 ERA) vs. Randy Wolf (2-5, 5.06 ERA)

??? vs. Shaun Marcum (5-3, 3.39 ERA)

??? vs. Yovani Gallardo (5-5, 4.23 ERA)

As you can see, there are a few TBAs on the Blue Jays’ side. That’s because they’ve been having Brewers-injury luck lately. Within a five-day span, three members of their starting rotation were injured- Brandon Morrow, Kyle Drabek, and Drew Hutchison. But, on the bright side, the Brewers won’t have to face Morrow, who was leading the American League in shutouts and appeared to be on his way to an All-Star campaign.

> Anyway, thanks for reading, and feel free to leave your thoughts.


News from MLB over the past few days…

November 20, 2011

> There really hasn’t been much news in baseball over the past few days, which is why you didn’t see a post last night. So, here’s a bit of a recap of what’s happened, but it isn’t much…

> The biggest piece of news was Matt Kemp signing an eight-year deal with the Dodgers. There were rumors that the Dodgers were close to signing Kemp earlier this week, but it was just finalized yesterday.

Kemp had an unbelievable season in 2011, hitting .324 with 39 home runs and 126 RBIs. He also had 41 stolen bases, making him a 30/30 player, and nearly a 40/40 player. He and Ryan Braun are the two top contenders for the NL MVP this year, which is going to be announced on Monday.

> Carlos Zambrano was hit in the face by a line drive today during a winter ball start in Venezuela today. Apparently, he was having his best start since he started pitching this fall, but needed to exit the game after being hit.

So you can add yet another chapter to the odd career of the usually-psychotic Cubs pitcher. It seems like every possible negative thing in baseball that can happen to a player happens to Zambrano. Most of the time, it’s his fault, but this time it isn’t.

Zambrano is in winter ball because he missed the last month and a half of the 2011 season after being placed on the restricted list by the Cubs. This all started because he threw inside multiple times to Chipper Jones in a start against the Braves, in which he was getting crushed and was letting his frustration out. He was ejected, and while the benches cleared and his team was fighting for him, Zambrano simply walked off the field laughing. He then walked into the clubhouse, cleaned out his locker, and told the reporters that he was going to retire.

That may have been the break the Cubs were looking for, but, of course, Zambrano didn’t follow through with it.

In reaction to this performance, the Cubs placed Zambrano on the restricted list, as I mentioned earlier, which makes a player ineligible to be around the team or be paid for 3o days. Even after Zambrano’s time on the restricted list was finished (wow, sounded like he was in jail when I put it like that), he didn’t return to the team.

Anyway, that’s the story. Zambrano was having a crappy season as it was, definitely the worst of his career. It was the first time he had an ERA over 4.00, but still posted a winning record. Theo Epstein has announced that Zambrano is going to have to “work his way back” to get a spot on the Cubs’ roster next year, but I think we all know that he’s probably going to be there anyway.

> The Blue Jays have announced that they’re going to have a new logo for next year, and they’re basing it off their traditional logo. Which is awesome, because that Blue Jays logo is my second favorite logo in MLB history (only to the Brewers retro glove logo). Hopefully, it gives them some luck to win the AL East (or at least the Wild Card).

> The Twins signed catcher Ryan Doumit to a two-year deal, which pretty much means they’re expecting Joe Mauer to get injured at this point. Can you blame them?

Anyway, the Brewers had seen Doumit, the former Pirates’ catcher, a lot over the past few years. He tended to be a Brewers-killer, so it’s good that he’ll be out of the league.

> Dale Sveum has been officially named the Cubs’ new manager. You can read my post the other day about my take on that, because it would be a waste of time for me to do it again right here.

> Onto some minor Brewers moves from yesterday and today.

> The Brewers have added four prospects to their 40-man roster yesterday. They are outfielder Caleb Gindl, first baseman Brock Kjeldgaard, right-handed pitcher Santo Manzanillo, and third baseman Zelous Wheeler. With these additions, the Brewers’ 40-man roster stands at 35. And, because these players were added to the roster, they can’t be taken by other teams in the upcoming Rule 5 Draft.

> I noticed the other day that Yovani Gallardo came in seventh place in the NL Cy Young Award voting. That has to be the best any Brewers’ pitcher has done in the voting in years. Gallardo wasn’t quite good enough to win, but his win total and strikeouts probably put him in the race (17-10, 3.52 ERA, 207 strikeouts in 207 innings were his overall numbers).

> And that’s about all I’ve got right now. But, before I go, I just want to explain something new that I might be doing on this blog soon.

With the lack of news around MLB some days, I’m finding myself with nothing to post about. That’s happened to me twice over the past week, and definitely isn’t helping this blog get any more popular. So, I’m thinking about writing about things in Brewers’ history on days that there isn’t much news. By “things,” I mean historical seasons, players, events, top 10 players at a certain position, and so on. I think that would be something good to mix it up once in awhile, because up to now I’ve really just been blogging about news. There’s nothing wrong with that, and I love doing it, but I just want to try something different.

> Anyhow, feel free to leave you thoughts, if you have any.


Royals hope to improve pitching staff with… walks?

November 8, 2011

> The Royals and Giants started the second week of 2011’s offseason with a somewhat surprising trade.

Melky Cabrera, the Royals’ regular center fielder, has been sent to the Giants in exchange for lefty starter Jonathan Sanchez. The Giants also sent Minor League pitcher Ryan Verdugo along with Sanchez.

Cabrera is coming off a career year with the Royals, which is why it kind of surprises me that they would just trade him. He hit .305 with 18 home runs and 87 RBIs- not bad for being on a fourth place team. But, those numbers will probably help the Giants, who have close to no offense in their lineup.

Sanchez, on the other hand, missed most of 2011 and made just 19 starts, going 4-7 with a 4.26 ERA. But, in 2010, he went 13-9 with a 3.07 ERA, and threw a no-hitter in 2009 against the Padres.

Sanchez definitely has some down sides, however- and that includes his number of walks given up. In 2010, despite his good numbers, he led the NL in walks, and, in 2011, averaged 5.9 walks per nine innings before going on the DL. But the Royals are doing everything they can to improve their rotation, because it probably isn’t a good sign when Bruce Chen has put up the best numbers in your rotation over the past few years. (Nothing against Chen, he’s actually a solid pitcher, but not an ace.)

> The Twins fired GM Bill Smith in favor of Terry Ryan today. I guess this wasn’t extremely surprising, considering the Twins looked nothing like the playoff team they usually are in 2011, as they went 63-99. But, before this season, the Twins had won four division titles under Smith.

Justin Morneau, Joe Mauer, and Tsuyoshi Nishioka certainly didn’t help Smith’s case. Morneau and Mauer, two former AL MVPs, were signed to big, multi-year contracts back in 2008, but have been plagued with injuries and inconsistency ever since. Nishioka, meanwhile, was signed after the Twins won a bidding to sign him from the international free agent pool, and, courtesy of Nick Swisher, was injured just a few months into his first season in the MLB.

Anyway, as of right now, Ryan is considered the interim GM, meaning his job may not be permanent if the Twins find someone better. Ryan has already been the Twins GM (1994-2007), and served as the senior adviser up until this point.

By the way, I heard Ryan’s first order of business as Twins GM will be to evaluate their medical staff. Hm, I wonder why…

> And that was about all the news for today. There was no Brewers’ news, unfortunately, but I guess that’s to be expected early in the offseason. But I did hear that the Winter Meetings are going to be held in Milwaukee this year, which is pretty cool.

> Anyway, feel free to leave a comment or something. Anything to make this site look at least remotely busy.


Quick Notes Before Sunday’s Game…

July 3, 2011

Update- 10:01a I just heard that Mat Gamel is going to be starting at third base in place of McGehee today. I thought the Brewers made it clear that they were going to use him exclusively as a first baseman, but some insurance at third isn’t a bad thing, I guess.

9:12a There are a few things that I wanted to go over in last night’s post, but it would have probably gotten too lengthy, so I just thought I’d do them right now.

Saito makes strong return from DL, Dillard optioned

Reliever Takashi Saito finally finished his long road back from the disabled list last night, and had his best outing of the season (out of the three appearances he’s had). He pitched a perfect inning while striking out one. That one strikeout came against Joe Mauer, who does not strike out much. But Saito got him with a nasty slider that, needless to say, I did not know a 41-year old was capable of throwing. He is currently 1-1 with a 6.00 ERA (again, over just three appearances).

If I counted correctly, Saito injured himself three different times trying to come back from the disabled list, aside from the actual injury that put him on the disabled list. Saito had also left the team for awhile in Spring Training because of the earthquake in Japan.

In a corresponding move, to make room for Saito, struggling reliever Tim Dillard was optioned to Triple-A Nashville. During his stint with the Brewers, Dillard went 1-1 with a 5.00 ERA, giving up 10 runs over 18 innings of work. Eight of those ten runs were given up over his last eight appearances, which shows his struggles have come as of late.

Braun to sit out rubber match

Ryan Braun was supposedly injured last night, and was suddenly yanked out of the game in the 8th inning. I found out late last night that he apparently strained his calf coming out of the batter’s box during his last at-bat, which was an RBI groundout. He claimed that he is “definitely not playing on Sunday.”

Amidst slump, McGehee to get a few days off

Slumping third baseman Casey McGehee got last night off, and will probably be given a few more days before returning to the starting lineup. McGehee has not been himself all season, hitting just .221 with four home runs and 33 RBIs. He has also struggled mightily with runners in scoring position, another thing that is very uncharacteristic of him.

Last season, McGehee’s first full season with the Brewers, he hit .285 with 23 homers and a team-leading 104 RBIs. If he keeps up what he’s been doing, however, he’ll be on track for much worse numbers, possibly the worst of his career.

Greinke needs to pick up the pace…

This morning, I was reading an article in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel that portrayed my thoughts about our prized offseason acquisition perfectly- Zack Greinke needs to start doing better for the Brewers. Despite his 7-3 record, his ERA is a whopping 5.63- the highest in the Brewers’ rotation- and typically gets a lot of run support, hence the seven wins. Greinke is coming off of a disaster start, unquestionably his worst start of the season- he gave up 7 runs in just 2 innings against the Yankees at Yankee Stadium, where he is 0-3 with an 11.31 ERA in his career.

The reason Greinke’s ERA is so high is because of three bad starts, and he has a 13.50 ERA during those starts. His ERA in all of his other starts is a much more respectable 3.88, although even that isn’t great for the 2009 AL Cy Young Award winner. He went 16-8 with a 2.16 ERA that year, and those are the numbers the Brewers are looking for Greinke to repeat.

Greinke will pitch against the Twins at Target Field today. Coincidentally enough, Greinke’s numbers at Minnesota stadiums aren’t much better than his numbers at Yankee Stadium. In nine games (seven starts) at the Metrodome and Target Field, Greinke is 1-5 with a 4.79 ERA. Last year, he was 0-3 with a 6.00 ERA at the new Target Field. Hopefully Greinke can put those numbers behind him and give the Brewers a win today.