Peralta’s decent start spoiled by Conforto

May 21, 2016

RECAP

> It wasn’t great, but it was a step in the right direction for the struggling Wily Peralta. Unfortunately, he gave up a key hit at the wrong time that cost him a potential win in the Brewers’ 3-2 loss to the Mets on Friday night. Milwaukee ran into lefty Steven Matz (6-1, 2.81 ERA), one of the hottest pitchers in baseball at the moment, and couldn’t do much to back Peralta (2-5, 6.99 ERA).

The Brewers did jump on him in the first inning, as Chris Carter slugged his thirteenth home run of the year, a two-run shot to right center. That would be all for the offense, however. Matz dominated the rest of the way, throwing seven innings of two-run ball while giving up just three hits. He didn’t walk a batter and struck out eight.

Peralta managed to hold the lead for a while, but his 2016 struggles once again showed up in the middle innings. He bent but didn’t break in the second when he gave up an RBI groundout to Rene Rivera. The Mets ambushed him in the sixth, however, as after Asdrubal Cabrera led off the inning with a single, Michael Conforto hit a go-ahead, opposite field two-run homer.

> Honestly, this was looking like Peralta’s best start of the season until Conforto gave the Mets the lead. He ended up not making it through the sixth, finishing at 5 2/3 innings while giving up three runs on six hits. Peralta walked two and struck out a season-high six. It was encouraging to see him making effective use of his heavy sinking fastball, as he’s still struggling to find his slider in 2016 (though he did throw a few good ones tonight).

Unfortunately for Peralta, this might not be enough to keep him in the rotation when Matt Garza returns. With the rest of the rotation’s pitching headed in the right direction as of late, it’s hard to imagine anyone other than Peralta getting the boot when the time comes.

NEWS

> Domingo Santana was placed on the 15-day disabled list today with right shoulder soreness. Santana’s ailing shoulder has kept him out of the lineup multiple times over the past few weeks and, according to Craig Counsell, he hasn’t been making much progress.

In a corresponding move, the Brewers recalled outfielder Keon Broxton from Triple-A Colorado Springs. Broxton was Milwaukee’s opening day center fielder in 2016, but he was quickly optioned after going 0-for-16 with 11 strikeouts in his first stint in the Majors. In 25 games at Triple-A, however, Broxton hit .301 with seven home runs, 18 RBIs, and 15 stolen bases. The potential is obviously there, so hopefully he can figure it out at the big league level this time around.

> Ryan Braun was absent from the lineup once again today, likely because of the stiff back that held him from each of the two games prior. Counsell said he could return to the lineup this weekend against the Mets, but if that doesn’t happen, a trip to the 15-day DL could be in order.

With Santana on the DL and Braun shelved indefinitely at the moment, Kirk Nieuwenhuis and Alex Presley will likely both see even more playing time in the coming days. Broxton and Ramon Flores will receive an increase as well.

> Nieuwenhuis and Carlos Torres, each of whom were members of the Mets at some point last season, received their 2015 National League championship rings upon returning to Citi Field.

> The Yankees signed ex-Brewer reliever Neal Cotts to a minor league deal today. The Brewers could have used him this season with their lack of reliable left-handed relief until Will Smith returns.

> The Rays released catcher Carlos Corporan, another former Brewer.

STATS

> Broxton went 0-for-2 in his first big league start since being demoted on April 16, extending his hitless streak to 0-for-18 to start his big league career.

> Chris Capuano, who pitched for the Mets in 2011, struck out five batters in two hitless innings of relief.

> Matz won his sixth consecutive start. Since getting lit up by the Marlins in his season debut, Matz is 6-0 with a 1.35 ERA.

> The Brewers will look to even up this three-game series tomorrow at 3:10 p.m. CT, but will have to face the ace of the Mets’ aces in Jacob deGrom (3-1, 2.50 ERA). Milwaukee will counter with Zach Davies (1-3, 5.58 ERA), who is coming off his best start of the season in which he allowed two runs in 6 1/3 innings against the Padres.

In four career starts against the Brewers, deGrom has been dominant, going 3-1 with a 1.38 ERA. Davies has never faced the Mets.


Brewers eliminated on somber note

October 1, 2012

POSTGAME

> The way the Brewers “hit” today, they deserved to be mathematically eliminated from postseason contention. You would have never guessed that they would have been even close to contending the way they played today.

They were embarrassingly shut out by Jordan Lyles and the Astros, 7-0. Lyles, who came in 4-12 with a 5.44 ERA, threw his first career shutout, which was a four-hitter. He also hit a solo home run- and it was murdered.

THE NEWS

> Mike Fiers said this was the “best he felt all year.”  I guess I can understand that in one respect, considering he struck out 10. But he also struggled to miss bats, as he gave up four home runs to Lyles, Fernando Martinez, Jed Lowrie, and Matt Dominguez.

Fiers did wind up finishing the season, however. There were rumors of him getting shut down, but it never happened.

> Wily Peralta, on the other hand, was shut down after reporting more discomfort in his biceps. He would have only made one more start anyway, so I’m not going to flip out too much over this.

> Ron Roenicke doesn’t think Zack Greinke will return to the Brewers this offseason.

> Chris Narveson took his first bullpen session since his shoulder surgery.

> Even if the Brewers would have won today, it wouldn’t have mattered much, since the Cardinals also won.

THE NUMBERS

> Corey Hart’s two-homer game yesterday gave him his second career 30-home run season.

> Lyles needed just 103 pitches to kill the Brewers’ offense.

> The upcoming match-ups for the series against the Padres, the Brewers’ final series of the season:

Clayton Richard (14-13, 3.91 ERA) vs. Shaun Marcum (6-4, 3.74 ERA)

Casey Kelly (2-3, 6.21 ERA) vs. Tyler Thornburg (0-0, 5.00 ERA)

Andrew Werner (2-3, 4.78 ERA) vs. Yovani Gallardo (16-9, 3.65 ERA)

BOX SCORE

> So I was at the game today, and I noticed a strange graphic on the scoreboard. While Carlos Corporan was batting for the Astros, his stats showed that he had 17 home runs and 10 RBIs. Maybe FOX Sports Wisconsin runs the scoreboard, too. (Corporan only has four home runs, by the way.)


The second chances aren’t working

August 11, 2012

POSTGAME

> You can say all you want about how bad the Brewers’ bullpen is. It leads baseball in blown saves. I guess it hasn’t left Ron Roenicke with many options, but lately one option has actually emerged. It’s Jim Henderson, the 29-year old Canadian who has spent 10 years in the Minors before finally getting his chance at the Major League level. And he’s been producing. Coming into today, he had a 2.57 ERA (should be 1.29), and appeared to have the closer’s role locked down.

But, Roenicke did what he’s been doing FAR too much this season; try and give the struggling relievers second chances. And it cost starter Mark Rogers.

The Brewers lost to the Astros today, 4-3, courtesy of John Axford’s eighth blown save, and his seventh loss.

It was going fine early. In the first inning, Ryan Braun drove in Nyjer Morgan, who had reached on a dropped strike three. In the second inning, Astros starter Bud Norris threw a wild pitch with Jean Segura batting, which allowed Rickie Weeks to score from third, giving the Brewers an early 2-0 lead.

The Astros didn’t get on the board until the fifth inning on Carlos Corporan’s RBI single. Up until that inning, Rogers had held the Astros hitless through four innings. This was by far his best outing as a big leaguer, as he went seven innings while giving up a run on three hits (all in the fifth inning). He walked two and struck out eight.

The Brewers tacked on one more in the seventh on Segura’s RBI single.

So Roenicke must have thought it was 2011 today, because he used Francisco Rodriguez in the eighth, and Axford in the ninth. K-Rod gave up a home run to Corporan to cut the lead to 3-2, and from there retired the side in order.

Then Axford came in, and disaster once again struck.

Axford walked Brett Wallace to start the inning, who was pinch-run for by Tyler Greene. But, Greene advanced all the way to third base because of a wild pitch. Steve Pearce promptly tied the game with an RBI single and reached second base because of an error by center fielder Carlos Gomez. Scott Moore then drilled an Axford pitch to very deep center field (a few feet up Tal’s Hill), but Gomez managed to make the play, with Pearce tagging to third base. Brian Bogusevic dealt the finishing blow with a walk-off RBI single.

By the way, some people on Twitter were trying to blame Axford’s wild pitch on catcher Jonathan Lucroy. I’ll admit he didn’t make the best effort, but there’s honestly no point attempting to defend the bullpen anymore. It is what it is.

THE ANALYSIS

> I can’t explain everything, because I’d be attempting to figure out what goes on in the mind of Roenicke. I can’t do that, nor would I ever want to.

But I can say this. The Brewers have found another closer for the time being, that reliever being Henderson. But that’s useless if Roenicke continues to go back to the reliever who have failed the Brewers time and time again.

By the way- I’m not trying to come down on Axford, at least not directly. Obviously I have to blame him for the loss, considering he took the loss. But I’ve tried to stay away from mocking players directly lately, because I recently learned a lesson, that lesson being to not say anything online (or anywhere else) that you wouldn’t say to someone in person. I made that mistake three years ago on my old Twitter account, and I’ve made it a few times on my current account and even here on BWI. But I’ve tried to imply that rule to myself a lot more often lately, because I recently ran into Axford in person. All I could do was ask for a picture. Would I ever tell him “quit blowing saves” or “you’re horrible?” Heck no. There are plenty of people who do that on Twitter, and I don’t want to one of those people. But I’m a writer, so I have to at least be critical about it.

But I’m not afraid to come down on Roenicke, because it’s gotten to the point where I would probably blow up at him in person.

Anyway, I kind of rode off topic there, but I felt the need to get that out there.

> I was going to talk about the possibility of Mike Fiers (and other pitches) getting shut down before the end of the year, but I think I’m going to save that for another day. That topic requires its own article, because I’d also need to go into my opinion of that, pitch count, and so on.

THE NEWS

> Shaun Marcum made his first rehab start today for the Timber Rattlers (Single-A). He went three innings and threw 36 pitches, 28 for strikes. He gave up a solo home run, but was otherwise solid. He didn’t walk a batter and struck out three. Marcum was only scheduled to throw 35-40 pitches, so the low innings and pitch count were probably because he hadn’t thrown to live hitters in awhile.

Marcum hopes to return to the Brewers by their home series against the Cubs on August 20th.

> The innings limit suggested by Roenicke counts as news, I guess.

THE NUMBERS

> The bullpen is awful. You don’t need the numbers to tell you that anymore.

> Weeks went 3-for-4 with a career-high three doubles today.

> Gomez went 0-for-4 with three strikeouts, all against Norris.

> Segura got his first hit that left the infield, and his first hit that drove in a run.

> Rogers’ chance at his first career win was once again blown by the bullpen.

> Tomorrow’s match-up:

Marco Estrada (0-5, 4.13 ERA) vs. Dallas Keuchel (1-4, 5.60 ERA)

 


Time for umpires to be ejected- from baseball

August 9, 2012

> I’ve never been one to come down on umpires. I understand they have one of the toughest jobs in baseball. Just like players make mistakes, umpires will every so often as well.

Some people would disagree with this, but, in my opinion, umpires’ mistakes are usually by accident. Say there’s a bang-bang play at first base. Sometimes the naked eye just can’t see whether or not the runner was safe, without instant replay (but that’s another story). Since MLB refuses to expand instant replay, we have to accept the fact that umpires are human and will miss calls like that every now and then.

Those are the type of umpire mistakes I can accept. But, there was an incident last night where an umpire became selfish, and an innocent player was punished because of it. Those are the types of intentional mistakes that make me hate umpires.

The incident I’m referring to occurred in last night’s Nationals-Astros game. The first part of it happened in the fourth inning. Bryce Harper was at the plate, and Armando Galarraga (who, ironically, has one of the most famous run-ins with an ump of all time) was on the mound. Harper had an 0-2 count, and Galarraga threw a fastball that ran a bit outside. Catcher Carlos Corporan sort of framed the ball, but not enough to make it a strike. But, home plate umpire Angel Hernandez (heard that name before?) called Harper out. Harper didn’t explode about the strike call, but he let Hernandez know that he thought it was outside. Hernandez appeared to take it well, and didn’t eject Harper.

All seemed well until Harper’s next at-bat in the sixth inning. The Nats had the bases loaded with two outs against reliever Chuckie Fick, and Harper was in a favorable 3-1 count. So, Fick, a left-hander, threw a cutter to the also left-handed Harper that appeared to run outside- there was no question about this one. Harper waited for a strike call, didn’t hear it, and started to run to first base. But, after Harper took a few steps out of the batter’s box, Hernandez called a strike. You could see the discontent on Harper’s face as he walked back to the batter’s box.

On the next pitch, Fick threw a cutter in the exact same place. Harper once again started to run to first base, but Hernandez called that pitch a strike as well. Harper slammed his bat in anger, but made no gesture towards Hernandez, so he wasn’t ejected.

Still, this shows that Hernandez held a grudge against Harper from the fourth inning. He also probably wanted to see if he could break Harper and make him retaliate. Harper, who is just 19, handled it perfectly, although I wouldn’t have blamed him one bit for barking at Hernandez.

The point is that some umpires aren’t even doing their job anymore. They think fans come to the games to see them, which isn’t at all the case. MLB claims that they’re evaluating their umpires, but that is in no way true. If they actually were, guys like Hernandez, Joe West, Bob Davidson, and so on would be on the unemployment line right now.

#RobotUmps2013

The News

> The Brewers don’t play today, which is why I decided to put up an opinionated article. They start a three-game series with the Astros in Houston tomorrow.

> Shaun Marcum’s first rehab start for the Timber Rattlers was rained out today. Instead, he’ll make his scheduled start tomorrow at 5:35 PM CT in the first game of a double-header.

> I learned from EM this morning that the Cardinals traded the one-time highly-touted prospect Tyler Greene to the Astros for a player to be named later and/or cash considerations. This comes the night after Greene was booed by the “best fans in baseball” because he made an error that would have cost the Cards the game at the time. They went on to lose to the Giants 15-0, which wasn’t all Greene’s fault. But the game could have gone differently had he not made the error.

Anyway, Cards fans have always had mixed feelings about Greene, but the past few years they’ve found ways to blame him for everything. So I’m guessing the game last night was the last straw for Greene, and he requested a trade following it.

> Last night, a pretty funny situation happened to Reds media relations director Jamie Ramsey (@Jamieblog), who also runs a blog. After the Reds lost to the Brewers, he got into fights publicly with a bunch of Reds fans. He also apparently sent a threatening direct message to one of the guys he was in disagreement with. The user he sent it to posted a picture of the DM a few minutes later, and Ramsey deleted his account (which he brought back this morning). Deadspin got a hold of it, so you can guess what happened from there. (Here’s a link to Deadspin’s article, which posted all the conversations/pictures Ramsey was having.)

> The Orioles called up their top prospect today, shortstop Manny Machado. There was some speculation that the O’s, when they were in the running for Zack Greinke, would need to give him up, but they weren’t willing to do that.

Anyway, it’ll be interesting to see what they do with former Brewer JJ Hardy, who currently mans the starting shortstop position for the Orioles. Machado is starting at third base tonight, but his natural position is shortstop, so I can’t imagine they’d keep playing him at third (since Chris Davis and Mark Reynolds also need positions).

I would say this is a perfect time for the Brewers to claim Hardy off waivers and use him as a utilityman, but Hardy has been one of the Orioles’ best power hitters the past two years, so they probably wouldn’t give him up in the middle of a pennant race.

> MLB released its new playoff schedule today. It’s screwy this year, but is supposed to get better after this year:

October 4th: Regular season tiebreaker game(s) (if needed) (TBS)

October 5th: Tiebreaker games between the two Wild Card winners for each league (TBS)

October 6th: First two Division Series begin (TBS)

October 7th: Second two Division Series begin (TBS/MLBN)

October 13th: ALCS begins (FOX)

October 14th: NLCS begins (FOX)

October 24th: World Series begins at NL Park (FOX)

Now we see the effect of the two Wild Cards be added to late (if they should have been added at all). Everything is jam-packed at the beginning of the postseason. That causes the teams with worse records to have home field advantage in the first round due to time/travel issues. Sort of defeats the point of home field advantage, no? Everything returns to normal in the second round, however.

MLB Network is also going to be broadcasting a few DS games this fall for the first time in their history.

Probably none of this will apply to the Brewers, though.

> I updated the about page here at BWI. I made that page over a year ago when I first started BWI, so it was in desperate need of some updating.

On another note regarding the site, I’ve decided that I’m probably going to change the theme again. At first I liked the new theme, but lately it’s felt too busy and crowded. It makes the style of article I write feel messy and unorganized, and there are a ton of useless widgets that the theme doesn’t let me get rid of.

The Numbers

> Randy Wolf threw a 49 MPH eephus/curveball in yesterday’s game against the Reds. I think that’s a record low, even for him. You can watch the slow ball here.

> Anyway, that’s about it. I’ll be back tomorrow with more Brewers coverage.