The Gold Glove continues to be a screwy award

November 4, 2012

> If there’s going to be an award called a “Gold Glove” handed out to a player at each position every year, it should go to the best defensive player at that position for that given year, no?

Apparently not. Before I get into my point, here are the 2012 GG winners for each position:

American League:

C: Matt Wieters, Orioles
1B: Mark Teixera, Yankees
2B: Robinson Cano, Yankees
SS: J.J. Hardy, Orioles
3B: Adrian Beltre, Rangers
LF: Alex Gordon, Royals
CF: Adam Jones, Orioles
RF: Josh Reddick, Athletics
P: Jeremy Hellickson, Rays/Jake Peavy, White Sox

National League:

C: Yadier Molina, Cardinals
1B: Adam LaRoche, Nationals
2B: Darwin Barney, Cubs
SS: Jimmy Rollins, Phillies
3B: Chase Headley, Padres
LF:
Carlos Gonzalez, Rockies
CF: Andrew McCutchen, Pirates
RF: Jason Heyward, Braves
P: Mark Buehrle, Marlins

Plenty of guys were considered “snubbed” at their respective positions because of their reputation for making spectacular defensive plays. Take Mike Trout, for instance. He robbed home runs (literally going up the wall and bringing the ball back into the park) on three occasions this year as the center fielder for the Angels. But why did Jones win?

Statistically, Jones actually had a better defensive season than Trout; Jones had the better defensive WAR. Denard Span of the Twins also had a better defensive WAR than Trout.

In my opinion, that’s the way it should be- the guy who is statistically the best defender at each position should win. That happened in a few cases this year: Rollins had the best fielding percentage among NL shortstops, Barney committed just two errors at second base (which led NL second baseman, obviously), Teixera had just one error all year, Cano was tied for first in fielding percentage at second base, and so on.

But, of course, when it came to the possibility of a Brewer getting a Gold Glove, he got screwed. Aramis Ramirez led the NL in fielding percentage and had the fewest errors among qualifying third basemen. So who obviously wins the award at third base? Headley, duh.

But why? If one player has better defensive statistics than another player at a certain position, that player should win the Gold Glove. This is the one award I think should be strongly influenced by statistics, because there’s always going to be one player who is definitively better than another (statistically) at each position. Most of the defensive statistics go hand-in-hand, so it’s unlikely there’s going to be two players who each have one better defensive statistic than the other. This is a far different award than something like the MVP or Cy Young Award, in which there are a series of different statistics that don’t necessarily go hand-in-hand with each other. That makes for more of an argument for who should win those award, which is why it’s okay for there to be voters.

But there shouldn’t be a vote for the Gold Glove. There’s a best defensive player at each position, and that’s that.

THE NEWS

> The Brewers signed free agent righty Michael Olmsted to a minor league contract.

> Travis Ishikawa officially elected free agency.

> Two Brewers were selected to play in the Arizona Fall League Rising Stars game- Hunter Morris and Johnny Hellweg. Morris hit clean-up and went 1-for-1 with an infield single and a sacrifice fly.

> The Cubs nearly sent Carlos Marmol to the Angels in exchange for Dan Haren last night, but the deal wound up not going through. The Angels were looking for anything they could get before they had to decline Haren’s option for 2013, but, since the trade didn’t come to fruition, they were forced to decline the option. Haren is now a free agent and could be a possible fit for the Brewers.

> 10 teams are reportedly interested in lefty free agent Mike Gonzalez. I’d take him, seeing as the Brewers will be very thin on lefty relievers once again next year (if they have any). Manny Parra, the only lefty in the Brewers’ bullpen in 2012, is probably going to be one of the next guys to go.

> Minor moves:

Rockies: Outrighted Carlos Torres to Triple-A; reinstated Josh Sullivan, Todd Helton, Juan Nicasio, and Christian Friedrich from the 60-day DL.
Orioles: Outrighted Lew Ford, Zach Phillips, and Steven Tolleson to Triple-A.
Mets: Outrighted Mike Nickeas to Triple-A.
Twins: Outrighted Sam Deduno to Triple-A.
Royals: Outrighted Manny Pina to Triple-A; reinstated Danny Duffy and Felipe Paulino from the 60-day DL.
Mariners: Signed Hisashi Iwakuma to a two-year extension; re-signed Oliver Perez.
Blue Jays: Acquired Esmil Rogers from the Indians.
Indians: Acquired Mike Aviles and Yan Gomes from the Jays.
Cardinals: Outrighted Steven Hill, Bryan Anderson, and Adam Reifer to Triple-A.
Pirates: Outrighted Ali Solis to Triple-A.
Astros: Outrighted Chuckie Fick to Triple-A; outrighted Brian Bogusevic, Jorge De Leon, and J.B. Shuck, all of whom elected free agency.
Athletics: Re-signed Bartolo Colon to a one-year deal.
Marlins: Signed Kevin Kouzmanoff and Jordan Smith to minor league deals.


Weeks beats Rox to give K-Rod win in Crew debut

July 17, 2011

11:30p Hearing the phrase “The Brewers won on the road” isn’t very common, but hearing “The Brewers won at Coors Field” is even more uncommon.

Brewers-Rockies Wrap-Up

The Brewers pulled out a great win today against the Rockies, 8-7. It was back-and-forth all game, but in the end, some clutch hitting and bullpen work gave the Crew the win.

The Rockies got on the board first in the second inning, but in a frustrating way. After Brewers starter Zack Greinke gave up a two-out triple to Ian Stewart, catcher Jonathan Lucroy dropped a third strike, then a wild throw to first allowed Stewart to score. Chris Iannetta drove in Dexter Fowler, who reached on the dropped strike, with an RBI double. Jhoulys Chacin would follow with a RBI single to make it 3-0, Rockies. None of these runs were charged to Greinke, however. Greinke would exit after six innings. He gave up three runs (none earned) on five hits while walking two and striking out eight. This was the first time this season that Greinke did not give up an earned run during a start.

The Brewers finally got to Chacin in the fifth. After Chacin walked Greinke on four pitches, Corey Hart hit a frozen rope line drive homer to cut the deficit to 3-2.

The Brewers also got to Chacin in the seventh, when he ran into some control issues. Josh Wilson and Lucroy hit back-to-back singles to start the inning, then Craig Counsell, pinch-hitting for Greinke, advanced both runners with a sacrifice bunt. Chacin’s night ended after he hit Hart with a pitch to load the bases. Chacin went 6 1/3 innings while giving up five runs on seven hits. He walked one and struck out five.

Matt Reynolds came in in relief of Chacin, but the Brewers got to him as well. Nyjer Morgan laid down a perfect drag bunt to score Wilson. Then, during the same play, first basemen Todd Helton attempted to throw the ball home with his glove, but the ball went over the catcher’s head, allowing the go-ahead run to score. Mark Kotsay followed up with a sac fly to give the Brewers a 5-3 lead.

LaTroy Hawkins came in relief of Greinke, but, after letting the first two batters reach and retiring only one batter, Ron Roenicke decided to go to his bullpen. And who does he call? Kameron Loe.

Loe let both of Hawkins’ runs score and was charged with one to himself, and blew yet another save. This gave the Rockies a 6-5 lead.

The Brewers countered in the eighth, when Yuniesky Betancourt scored on George Kottaras’ RBI groundout to tie the game at 6-6.

In the bottom of the eighth, the long awaited K-Rod debut finally happened. Francisco Rodriguez tossed a scoreless inning in his Brewers debut and worked around a Prince Fielder error. He would get the win, and you’re about to figure out why.

Huston Street was in for the Rockies to try and keep the game tied, but couldn’t do so. After walking Fielder, Rickie Weeks hammered a go-ahead homer to give the Brewers an 8-6 lead.

John Axford came in the bottom of the inning to record his 24th save of the year, despite giving up a run.

K-Rod makes Brewers debut

Rodriguez finally made his Brewers debut today, and did something that the rest of the Brewers’ bullpen has struggled to do- throw a somewhat clean inning. It wasn’t a perfect inning because the worst defensive first baseman in baseball (Fielder) made an error, but Rodriguez worked around it and was eventually rewarded the win.

Anyway, I could get used to seeing innings like this. I can tell just from that one inning today that Rodriguez is going to be our most consistent reliever for the rest of the year.

Street continues to struggle against Brewers

Street’s struggles against the Brewers against the Brewers continued today, as he gave up a go-ahead shot to Weeks in the ninth. Coming into today, Street’s career numbers against the Brewers were 0-1 with a 5.79 ERA.

Braun exits early with more injuries…

Ryan Braun exited the game early today with a calf strain AND a hamstring strain. He hasn’t been running very well all series, so I guess it was bound to happen. Hopefully this doesn’t set him back for too long.

Anyway… I might add more tomorrow. But I’m completely exhausted right now… The only reason I’m awake is because of sheer excitement from the Brewers win.


Full 2011 All-Star Rosters

July 3, 2011

12:52p The full All-Star rosters for 2011 have been officially announced. Starters, pitchers, reserves, etc., we know them all now. So, right before the Brewer game starts, I thought I’d list all of the players who made the All-Star Game at their respective positions. (Starters are listed first.)

American League

Catchers: Alex Avila, Tigers; Matt Wieters, Orioles; Russell Martin, Yankees

First Base: Adrian Gonzalez, Red Sox; Miguel Cabrera, Tigers

Second Base: Robinson Cano, Yankees; Howie Kendrick, Angels

Shortstop: Derek Jeter, Yankees; Asdrubal Cabrera, Indians

Third Base: Alex Rodriguez, Yankees; Adrian Beltre, Rangers

Outfielders: Jose Bautista, Blue Jays; Curtis Granderson, Yankees; Josh Hamilton, Rangers; Matt Joyce, Rays; Michael Cuddyer, Twins; Jacoby Ellsbury, Red Sox; Carlos Quentin, White Sox

Designated Hitters: David Ortiz, Red Sox; Michael Young, Rangers

Starting Pitchers: Justin Verlander, Tigers; Jered Weaver, Angels; Josh Beckett, Red Sox; James Shields, Rays; Gio Gonzalez, Athletics; Felix Hernandez, Mariners; David Price, Rays; C.J. Wilson, Rangers

Relief Pitchers: Mariano Rivera, Yankees; Jose Valverde, Tigers; Chris Perez, Indians; Aaron Crow, Royals; Brandon League, Mariners

National League

Catchers: Brian McCann, Braves; Yadier Molina, Cardinals

First Base: Prince Fielder, Brewers; Joey Votto, Reds; Gaby Sanchez, Marlins

Second Base: Rickie Weeks, Brewers; Brandon Phillips, Reds

Shortstop: Jose Reyes, Mets; Troy Tulowitzki, Rockies; Starlin Castro, Cubs

Third Base: Placido Polanco, Phillies; Chipper Jones, Braves

Outfielders: Ryan Braun, Brewers; Lance Berkman, Cardinals; Matt Kemp, Dodgers; Matt Holliday, Cardinals; Hunter Pence, Astros; Justin Upton, Diamondbacks; Jay Bruce, Reds; Carlos Beltran, Mets

Starting Pitchers: Roy Halladay, Phillies; Cole Hamels, Phillies; Cliff Lee, Phillies; Jair Jurrjens, Braves; Clayton Kershaw, Dodgers; Tim Lincecum, Giants; Matt Cain, Giants; Ryan Vogelsong, Giants

Relief Pitchers: Jonny Venters, Braves; Brian Wilson, Giants; Joel Hanrahan, Pirates; Heath Bell, Padres; Tyler Clippard, Nationals

AL Final Vote Candidates: Alex Gordon, Royals; Adam Jones, Orioles; Paul Konerko, White Sox; Victor Martinez, Tigers; Ben Zobrist, Rays

NL Final Vote Candidates: Michael Morse, Nationals; Shane Victorino, Phillies; Andre Ethier, Dodgers; Todd Helton, Rockies; Ian Kennedy, Diamondbacks

So the Brewers have three All-Stars in the starting lineup, a franchise record. The Brewers did not get any reserves or pitchers, but I guess there wasn’t really a chance because Bruce Bochy (NL manager) chose three of his own pitchers (Cain, Lincecum, Vogelsong). Not to mention Wilson got a players’ vote. I was hoping Yovani Gallardo and his nine wins would get in somehow, or Marcum and his decent ERA, but you can’t really compete with Giants or Phillies. (I forgot to point out that the stars of the Philadelphia rotation- Halladay, Hamels, and Lee- all made it. I bet Roy Oswalt would have made it as well, but he’s injured.)

As far as the AL goes, it’s the typical starting lineup for them, meaning the Yankees and Red Sox took most of the positions. Every starter for them is a player of the AL East, save for Avila and Hamilton.


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